Advertisements

Official Result: 7th WEST COAST 200K Ultramarathon Race

14 10 2019

7th WEST COAST 200K Ultramarathon Race (2019)

4:00 AM October 11 To 4:00 AM October 13, 2019 (Cut-Off Time: 48 Hours)

Subic Freeport, Olongapo City To Barangay Lucap, Alaminos City

Number Of Starters: 9 Runners

Number Of Finishers: 8 Finishers

Percentage Of Finish: 88.8%

2019 (7th) West Coast 200K Ultramarathon Starters

RANK      NAME       TIME (Hrs)

  1. Carlito Don Rudas (Overall Champion)—38:32:02
  2. Laico Tolentino (1st Runner-Up, Overall)—39:39:00
  3. Ralph Louie Jacinto (2nd Runner-Up, Overall)—43:35:38
  4. Dixie Sagusay (Female Champion)—44:21:02
  5. Barney Mamaril—46:25:54
  6. Jonas Olandria—46:35:18
  7. Christian Torres—47:02:48
  8. Khristian Caleon—47:49:10

Overall Champion Carlito Don Rudas

Overall Female Champion Dixie Sagusay

Congratulations To All The Finishers!

Advertisements




Official Results: 3rd PAU 6-Hour & 12-Hour Endurance Runs

16 09 2019

PAU 6-Hour & 12-Hour Endurance Runs

Philippine Army Grandstand & Parade Ground’s Jogging Lane

5:00 AM To 5:00 PM September 15, 2019

6-Hour & 12-Hour Runs Starters

PAU 6-Hour Endurance Run

RANK    NAME        KILOMETERS

  1. Edwin Fernandez —50
  2. Mark Ebio —45
  3. Remy Caasi —40
  4. Bryan Francia —39
  5. Ranchi Alvendia —38
  6. Rose Ann Menendez —37
  7. Elena Tuñacao —36
  8. Jerard Asperin —35
  9. Rona De Queroz —34
  10. Erica Batac —33
  11. Rexie Vaflor —32
  12. Rene Gonzales —30

6-Hour Endurance Run Finishers

PAU 12-Hour Endurance Run

RANK   NAME       KILOMETERS

  1. Jubert Castor —85
  2. Ian Torres —73
  3. Cheche Magramo —72
  4. Dixie Sagusay —68
  5. Janice Reyes —67
  6. Emery Torre —65
  7. Frank Flora —61
  8. Ralph Louie Jacinto —60
  9. Jojo Arevalo —60
  10. Laico Tolentino —57

12-Hour Endurance Run Finishers

Congratulations To All The Finishers!





Oldest Finishers Of Famous Ultra Races

13 09 2019

Through my research on the Internet, I have the following data on the Oldest Finisher of the famous Ultrarunning Races in the World:

At the Leadville 100-Mile Endurance Race in Colorado, USA, Charles Williams holds the record of the oldest man to ever complete the race, which he did at the age of 70 in 1999. He was featured in the August 1999 issue of GQ magazine, which compared his training for the race to that of a professional football player. The race has a cut-off time of 30 hours. (Wikipedia)

At the Badwater 135-Mile Ultramarathon Race which is considered as the “Toughest Footrace In The World” in California, USA, the oldest male finisher ever was Jack Denness, at the age of 75 years old and he is from United Kingdom. He finished the said race in the 2010 edition of Badwater 135. The race has a cut-off time of 48 hours. (Wikipedia)

Christophe Geiger of Switzerland, the Oldest UTMB Finisher

“Battling a 46:30 cutoff, 73-year-old Christophe Geiger of Switzerland crossed the finish line with just five minutes to spare. It was his fourth consecutive—but first successful—attempt at completing the race. The only participant in the Veterans 4 division, he became the oldest finisher of UTMB in its 13 years of existence, and was arguably the most admired and beloved person in the Chamonix valley this week.” (Runners World Magazine)

Nick Bassett, 73, finish before the 30-hour overall cut off at the 2018 edition of the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run, he became the oldest finisher of the iconic 100 miler, crossing the finish line in Auburn, California, in 29:09:42 hours. Ray Piva set the previous Western States 100-Mile record back in 1998 at the age of 71. (Runners World Magazine)

Nick Bassett @ The 2018 Western States 100-Mile Endurance Race

Looking on the above mentioned data/information on the Oldest Finishers of famous Ultrarunning Events in the World, it is observed that all of them are at the age bracket of 70 years old and above. Obviously, the background of these runners are very impressive being myself as a marathon and ultramarathon runner. They are better, stronger and faster than me during their peak days and years as compared to my capability when I was younger. However, with the proper training and preparation, I could also have the goal to finish some of these races, maybe, one or two of them before I finally end my career in running. God permits.

I will let these ultra runners as my inspirations in my future endeavors in ultra running, whether on the road or trail. I am now 67 years old and I hope to run more years and be able to reach the 70s. It is time to be more healthy, more smart in training, improve on my nutrition, and consistent in my workouts. It will be a tall order to follow the footsteps of these Old Finishers but I know I can do what they have done. The process will be long, hard and challenging but it takes some guts to start and do something to attain such goal. I expect that there will be some failures and lessons to be learned from them but the goal to finish these races will be a priority. You will read my progress in this blog.





Good Job, DENR On Boracay’s Recovery

5 09 2019

Good Job, DENR On Boracay’s Recovery!

Through the verbal orders of President Rodrigo Duterte last year, Boracay Island was closed to tourism due to his description that, “Boracay is a cesspool!”  Immediately, even with the uproar of the commercial establishments and locals in the island from its closure, the different Executive Departments  that were tasked had to carry on to implement  the orders of the President. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) had spearheaded the group of other Departments of the government in seeing to it that the problem in Boracay will be solved. After about six months, before the end of last year, Boracay Island was re-opened to the public and to tourism. Much had been said and published in the daily printed media as well in the Social Media about the positive results that came up and instituted during those times that the island was closed.

Last May of this year, I had the chance to visit the island since it was re-opened and I was impressed about the developments and improvements made, although some infrastructural projects were still being done at that time. There is a big difference from the time I last visited the island in the later months of 2017 after my runners finished that year’s edition of the Antique 100-Mile Endurance Race. The main road on the island had been widened and concreted with wider sidewalks with more vehicles and vans plying along the said road. The beach had been rejuvenated with more sand coming from the sea and the beach portion became wider as there were no longer furnitures; table and chair sets; and the strict removal of lots of shades/extensions from the commercial establishments/hotels  along the beach area. In the early morning of the day, I would see a truck of the island’s Sanitary Services to be sucking the drainage from the underground sewerage system at the middle of the main road system and I was informed that this is done everyday. I was told also that every establishment in the area had to pay a regular amount of fee for this purpose. Cleanliness is very imminent in the area as more trash bins had been placed along the roads as well as in strategic places along the beach. A truck that collects these trash from the said bins had been regularly seen along the main road and on the beach.

Last month, after the conduct of the 7th edition of the Antique 100-Mile Endurance Run, I had the chance to visit the island again for this year. There are more more tourists going in and going out of the island was observed as compared from my visit last May. Everything was done in an orderly manner from the time tourists are being dropped off at the Caticlan Seaport up to the time they are brought to the place where they made their reservation for their stay in the island. Everybody visiting the island should have a prior reservation to a hotel or inn in the island for them to be transported or allowed to board any boat to the said island. Only the locals and employees of the government and commercial establishments in the island are exempted from this regulation. With the assistance of the Philippine Army unit deployed in the island, the runners and I were given VIP attention up to the time we reached our respective billeting area in the island. Since we arrived in the island on the early morning of Sunday, we had our Brunch in one of the popular local restaurants instead of having the usual “boodlefight”. After lunch, we went to the Beach Area; took some pictures; and just watched the people around us. Some of the runners had their recovery walks along the beach.

The following day, I made a leisure walk from Station 3 (southernmost part) all the way to the northern most beach area of the island and I was able to see more hotels and building structures that were closed; removed and destroyed as a result of the strict implementation of Environmental Laws in the area. I will let the following pictures speak for themselves.

Boracay’s Rock Is Already OFF LIMITS To The Public

Establishments That Are Closed & Abandoned

Discontinued and Abandoned Building

Closed Establishment Awaiting Issuance Of Permit

Boracay Beach Rules & Regulations

The following are the Rules and Regulations at the Beach of Boracay Island:

  1. No Littering.
  2. Strictly No Smoking
  3. No Drinking Of Alcohol.
  4. No Illegal Drugs
  5. No Excessively Loud Music
  6. No Pets
  7. No Fire Dancing
  8. No Building of Commercial Sandcastles.
  9. No Strctures and Furniture

All these Rules and Regulations are being being strictly implemented by the PNP deployed in the beach area. I have observed in my latest visit to the island that there are roving PNP personnel, as well as, stationary PNP personnel in pairs in every 20 meters along the beach area.

Parts of the Building Had To Be Removed

Widening of the Dirt Road Along The Beach In Progress

The “closing and cleaning” of Boracay that resulted to its “rest and recovery” is an example of political will of the President Duterte to order something for the good of the environment; local populace and for the instrumentalities of the government to implement such order. I heard that appropriate administrative and criminal charges had been filed to those government people who allowed such environmental laws to be violated, to include those commercial establishments that violated such building permit/s and environmental laws. In my conversation with some of the owners of the establishments who became as my friends when I was still in the military service, they said that business is getting better after it was re-opened to the public and they expect that the beauty and orderliness in the island shall be maintained or even improved as more infrastructural projects will be completed this year. My personal congratulations is directed to Secretary Roy Cimatu of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources for leading TEAM of the government departments for a job well done! Truly, Boracay is an international tourist destination that our country should be proud of. We should preserve the beauty of this island.





Repost: Top 3 Hot Takes From The 2019 UTMB, CCC, & TDS Races By Jason Koop

4 09 2019

The following article is a repost from what Jason Koop, Head Coach of CTS Ultrarunning, had published in their CTS website and shared in the Social Media outlets. I have received a copy of this article in my e-mail as one of the CTS Athletes for the past two years. (Note: I am on rest and recovery up to the end of this year). I hope this article will be of help to future trail ultra runners who have plans of joining this iconic race.

Repost: Top 3 Hot Takes from the 2019 UTMB, CCC and TDS Races

By Jason KoopHead Coach of CTS Ultrarunning

As has been the case for the last few years, I spent the better part of a weekend following athletes around the (newly revamped) Sur les Traces des Ducs de Savoie (TDS), Courmayeur – Champex – Chamonix (CCC), and Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (UTMB) races. The races were packed with drama, success, failure and everything in between. From the front of the field through the final finishers, the mountain teaches us common lessons – sometimes the hard way – about how to prepare for and execute a great race.

Lesson #1- To win the race, you can be reasonably bold or just grind it out.

UTMB winners Pau Capel and Courtney Dauwalter days played out in seemingly opposing fashion, yet both ended up taking the top step of the podium. Pau took the lead early and never relinquished it, looking spry and springy all the way around the 170-kilometer course. Courtney on the other hand, quite frankly looked terrible the whole way. Normally a smiling and happy runner, she muddled, grunted and grinded her way to a 24 hour and 34 min winning time (which from a historical perspective is quite good).

As a quick comparison, go take a quick look at Update #8 and Update #9 from the final climb to Tête Aux Vents here- https://utmbmontblanc.com/en/live/utmb. It’s an easy compare and contrast of the styles from the winners of both races on the exact same climb.

What all runners can learn from this: There are several different pathways to the exact same result. If you are having a good day, take it and roll. Don’t get greedy with your race plan, but at the same time, if you are having a good day enjoy it and ride out the goodness, hopefully all the way to the finish line. On the other hand, if you are not having the best day and you have built up enough good fitness (as Courtney had), you should have enough resources to simply grind and tough it out. The day might not be all you hoped of, but you can still reach the finish line (and maybe surprise yourself along the way).

Lesson #2- Everyone has a bad day. The harder the race, the more the bad day is exacerbated.

Many of the top runners in the UTMB, CCC and TDS races did not have their days go to plan. Some of these runners ended up dropping out, while some ended up forging on for a respectable finish. Similarly, many of the mid- and back-of-the-pack runners we work with, and several I witnessed out on the course, were simply not having their best days. Although there is no easy ultra, the UTMB race in particular presents a wider variety of issues to contend with. The difficulty is compounded by the event’s length, starting at 6:00PM, running through the entire night right from the get go, copious amount of elevation gain, and the sheer energy of the Chamonix valley that drains the runners in advance of the starting gun. Generally speaking, athletes who got themselves into trouble in this race simply had a harder time bouncing back than those in the shorter (but still ridiculously hard) TDS and CCC.

What all runners can learn from this: If you are in a ridiculously hard race, do yourself a favor and play some defense early on. Aside from entering the race fit and ready, runners can do themselves a favor by running conservatively, taking some additional time at aid stations, having a good attitude, and – if there are any weather conditions ­– making sure you have enough gear to stay comfortable. All of these will give you a bit of downside protection for races where the penalty for failure is high!

Lesson #3- Multiple mistakes have compounding effects

Every runner wants to have a perfect race. Sorry to tell you, but those are rare. In a lifetime of running if you are able to scrape together a small handful of perfect races, consider yourself lucky. More often, ultramarathons are a series of problem solving exercises. Encounter some bad weather, move through it. Then, you will have a big, quad thrashing descent. After the descent, maybe your legs are giving you trouble. Your legs feel a bit better, then you have a monster climb ahead of you. Most runners can take each individual battle head-on in sequence by solving one problem and then moving to the next.

When issues pile on top of issues, the effect is greater than the sum of all the individual parts. I saw this unfold at the Beaufort (91.7 K) aid station during TDS. Nearly every runner from the front to the back of the field was tired at this point. CTS coach and eventual 2nd place finisher Hillary Allen (coached by Adam St. Pierre) even had the 1000-yard stare as she entered the aid station. As the day transpired, the runners arriving at the aid station complaining of one singular thing (I can’t eat, for example) would move in and move out quickly to tackle the next climb. The runners with a laundry list of issues (I can’t eat and my feet hurt and my quads are shot) took at least four times longer in the aid station and were moving at half the speed, regardless of where they were in the field. In this way, the runner who can’t eat but deals with it, then has their feet hurting and deals with that, and then has shot quads and deals with that, will finish far faster than the runner dealing with all three issues at once.

What all runners can learn from this: Dealing with issues during ultrarunning is inevitable. They are long and hard enough to present a host of problem solving opportunities. When these ‘opportunities’ creep up, don’t compound the problem by creating another one or not addressing the first. Address each issue as it comes up, when it comes up. ADAPT when necessary and slow down if you need to. It is far better to take a bit more time as issues creep up than continue to plow forward and create compounding issues.

I have always relished the opportunity to attend races as a coach, fan and support crew. These opportunities have always been ‘learning by observing’. The UTMB, CCC and TDS races were no exception. If you are reading, I hope you enjoyed the wonderful coverage of the event and some of these on the ground takeaways.

Carmichael Training System





John “Sting” Ray Onifa: The Pinoy Course Record Holder In 2019 UTMB’s CCC 101K Trail Race

2 09 2019

John “Sting” Ray Onifa: The Pinoy Course Record Holder In 2019 UTMB’s CCC 101K Trail Race

I have never met and still not a friend on Facebook of this very talented mountain trail runner. Because of this outstanding and admirable finish at this year’s CCC 101K Race in Chamonix, France, he deserves to be featured in this blog for whatever purpose. It could be an inspiration to future elite runners or a good reference to others. (Note: Hopefully this will used as a reference to our Local and National News and printed media). But one thing is sure, he is now the BEST Pinoy Ultra Trail Runner for finishing the 2019 CCC 101K Race from Courmayeur, Italy to Chamonix, France with a Course Record Time (For Pinoys) of 12:36:11 hours finishing with a ranking of 33rd place out of 2,000 runners and top 30 runners in the Male Category. His Average Speed for the course is 7.9 kilometers per hour (which is basically my average Road Running Speed) considering that this is his first exposure in running bigger/higher mountains than he usually race in Southeast Asia where altitude and technical nature of the trails usually slow down runners coming from the sea level places.

JR Onifa @ CCC 101K Race

Who is John “Sting” Ray Onifa? I bet that if you are more of an average Road Runner, you will never had the chance to meet him in person or read his name in local and national news or even meet him in the local and National MILO Marathon Events. Even the local trail runners in Luzon and Mindanao seldom would see this guy in more popular trail running events in the Cordilleras for the past years (except this year when he joined this year’s CMU). Except for the runners in Panay Island, he is well-known as a Road Runner and later on as an Ultra Marathon Runner having finished the local ultra races in Iloilo, Negros, and Antique. Later, he joined short distance trail running events within the area where he is from.

JR Onifa was born in Dao, Antique, now known as the Municipality of Tobias Fornier. Where is that place? Having been assigned in the Panay Island during my military days and visiting the Province of Antique almost every year for my Antique 100-Mile Endurance Run, it is my first time to know about the town. When I “googled” the name of the town, I found out that the municipality is located at the southernmost tip of Antique Province, way down south from the Capital Town of San Jose De Buenavista where my race usually starts. The town is bounded by mountains on the east and the sea on the west. You can “google” the name of the town for more details about the history and population data of the locality.

Young Elite Runners Use Trekking Poles @ UTMB

Due to the geography where he lives, JR Onifa was born in a poor family and ultimately earned his living through farming and fishing. I would suspect that he was able to complete his secondary education level only. For him to improve his life, he applied as a Candidate Soldier in the Philippine Army but he failed for three consecutive times to enter the service. How I wished I could had helped him during those times when he was trying to enter the military service. If he failed in the Neuro-Psychiatric Test (NP Screening), that is another story to deal with. To make things worse, his mother died and his father left the family. So, starting in 2015, he started running as part of his daily regimen while he was farming and fishing. Through his training, he became a well-known local runner when he won the local races in Antique and Iloilo, setting course records in every event.

It was on the early part of last year, 2018, when one of his friends who saw the elite running potential of JR Onifa started to ask for contributions and sponsorship through crowdsourcing for him to be exposed in international trail running events. His friend, Adonis Lloren aka LAGATAW  was very successful in bringing JR Onifa to Thailand to compete in the The North Face (TNF) 50K Ultra Trail Race on February 3, 2018.

JR Onifa @ The CCC Finish Line/Arc

The result of the said race completely changed the life of JR Onifa. He won as Champion with an Official Time of 4:01:51 hours in the said race, his first International Ultra Trail Competition, beating the elite athletes of the famous The North Face Adventure Team of Hongkong to include the Team Leader and Director Ryan S Blair who placed 3rd Overall in the said event. Director Ryan Blair was so impressed about the performance of JR Onifa and after a brief interview with JR Onifa about his background, he immediately thought of getting JR Onifa as his new recruit to the Team. Five days after the event in Thailand, Director Ryan Blair posted on the Team’s Facebook Page that JR Onifa had signed in as a full-time member of the The North Face Adventure Team based in Hongkong. I can just imagine how Director Ryan Blair felt when he found out the living situation of JR Onifa in the Philippines knowing for a fact that Director Blair had never brought a new recruit or member to his team for the past three years. Since then, JR Onifa had been a popular trail runner in Hongkong. In March 2018, he was able to get his Working Visa in Hongkong and since then he had been training in Hongkong as well as winning those popular trail races in the area. Simply browse on the Facebook Page of the The North Face Adventure Team (Hongkong) to find out those races where JR Onifa landed on Podium Finishes as well as those incidents that he would be lost along the trail despite being ahead from all the rest on the first half of the course! (This is so familiar to most of those local elite trail runners whom I know!) 

Director Ryan S Blair With JR Onifa

If Director Ryan S Blair would read this post, let me express my thanks to you for signing up JR Onifa to your ward of World Standard Elite Trail Runners. How I wish there are more people like you in my own country.

As of this writing, JR Onifa’s team mate Wong Ho Chung of Hongkong finished the UTMB 170K Trail Race in sixth place, highest ranking for an Asian Runner in the said event, with a time of 22:47:47 hours. This is his second time to finish UTMB where he was ranked as 38th Finisher with a time of 27:47:10 hours in the 2016 edition. He is awarded as the Hongkong’s 2019 Trail Runner of the Year.

Congratulations, Jay “Sting” Ray Onifa! You have put our National Colors again in the World of Ultra Trail Running Events. Keep up the good work and be good to your Team Members and Boss! At the young age of 29 years old, your career as a Professional Trail Runner is still starting. Be humble! I have the feeling that you will be standing the starting line at the 2020 UTMB/CCC 101K Trail Race again where you would proudly wave the Philippine Flag crossing the Finish Line as a Podium Finisher. I hope to see you soon in Hongkong!

(Note: Pictures Taken From The North Face Adventure Team Facebook Page)





Shoe Review: Kalenji “Run Support” Running Shoes, White & Black

30 08 2019

Shoe Review: Kalenji “Run Support” Running Shoes White & Black

It took for my Running Friend Jon Las Bruce of Decathlon to post a picture of the said running shoes (White Model) for me to be attracted to the shoes. Maybe it was because of the color White or maybe I need a reason to visit the Decathlon Store for the first time after months that this Sports Store (From France) has landed in the country. But most importantly, it was the price of the said shoes that really nailed the coffin, so to speak, to get a pair of this shoes. With a simple Private Message to JLB, he was able to reserve one pair for my size of 9.5 (US). Once I was in Manila, my priority was to get and buy the said shoes. 

After about one week of running and testing the White Model in my training for the 2019 Boston Marathon which was two weeks before the event, I was surprised on its cushioning, fit for comfort, and lightweight of the shoes. The cushioning is better than the average feeling that I get from my other road shoes. The fit was perfect because the uppers are very light and there are holes or spaces that provide better ventilation for my feet as I can feel air would flow inside the shoes through these spaces. The upper mesh provided maximum comfort because it is stretchable and it has minimal seams. It feels also that I thought I was running with my lighter racing shoes as the shoes weighs 263+ grams for my size of 9.5.

My White Kalenji Run Support Shoes

Later, I found out that there is a Black version of the said shoes and I immediately contacted JLB of Decathlon to reserve one pair of the said color which I will get as soon as I visit Metro Manila. Who would be happy to have two pairs of this particular model of Kalenji Running Shoes when the price is equivalent to 1/3 of the price of the other popular brands of running shoes? Yes, I became a sucker for this particular shoe model of Kalenji. Cheap, durable, comfortable, light, with much cushion and a 2-year warranty of the shoes are enough reasons for me to have these shoes in my Running Arsenal. The price of One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety Pesos for a pair is a stunner!

Well-Grooved and Sturdy Soles

I am not much of a technical person for me to mention to you the materials  used in the composition of the uppers, sole, linings, shoe laces, width of the forefoot/toe box, and stack height (difference on the thickness of the heel  and forefoot parts of the shoes). I have a feeling that the stack height of this particular model is 8-10 mm which is very good for my old feet. I had been bothered by my Achilles Tendinitis on my right foot when I run long distances on the road and I found out that the higher stack height would relieve the pain during my runs. That is one of bonuses or advantage of this shoes as compared to my other running shoes. The bottom line is that this Kalenji Running Shoes is a WINNER!

Reflectorized Kalenji Logo and Strip on The Shoe Tongue

Wait! Before I forget, these shoes have also reflectorized strips on the back/heel portion and front of the uppers. The Kalenji Logo with a strip on the tongue of the shoes would glow when a light is being directed to the shoes, the same with reflectorized strips at the back of the shoes. With these strips, you can be visible during your night running and thus, gives safety for the user from incoming faster moving vehicles at your front or behind you.

Up to this date, I have already ran more than 200 Kilometers for each of these shoes. Sometimes, I would combine the shoes, White on my right /left feet and the other Black on the other feet while running in my Playground! Yes, I usually use them also in my Trail Loop in my Playground and they give me much comfort and support to my old knees! By doing this combination of colored shoes in my running workouts, I would give them what they deserve on equal basis. After almost five (5) months of running with these shoes, I could barely see any wear and tear on their soles as compared to my Hoka One One “road to trail” shoes. Lately, during my running “stunt” at this year’s MILO Marathon, I used the Black Model of this particular shoes when I finished the MILO Half-Marathon running with a suit and tie.

My Black Kalenji Run Support (I am Size 43!)

It is a regret on my part not being able to decide to buy the RED model of this shoes when I saw it in the Decathlon Store in Mongkok, Hongkong. Maybe, I would buy this particular shoes in the future but how I wish I could buy and try their KIPRUN Trail shoes, too!

I highly recommend this shoes for daily running workouts, as well as, in short distance races. They are my GO running shoes when I decide to hit the paved roads when I do my tempo runs in preparation for my ultra tail events.

Why not? Running With the Kalenji Run Support Shoes White & Black At The Same Time

(Note: Buying my first Black Kalenji “Run Support” Shoes was my first visit to a Decathlon Store in the Philippines and since then I have been going back to the same store at Tiendesitas, Pasig City and when I go abroad, the first thing that I would ask “Google” is the location of the Decathlon Store in the city! Since then, I would buy some of my running attire from Decathlon. They are very cheap and you can get the best quality in terms of durability and comfort. Wow! Thanks to Jon Las Bruce and to the rest of the running staff of the said store for their immediate assistance whenever I visit the place. Of course, I paid for these Kalenji Shoes and I never had thought of getting FREE items in the store for my reviews. And one more thing, all the Decathlon Stores have a customers lounge where one could sit and relax, and also enjoy their Free Wi-Fi. Whenever I visit Hongkong, the Decathlon Store in Mongkok is my favorite “meet-up” place for those Pinoy runners.)








%d bloggers like this: