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Official Result: 5th WEST COAST 200K Ultra Marathon Race

28 08 2017

5th WEST COAST 200K Ultra Marathon Race

5:00 AM August 19, 2017 To 5:00 AM August 21, 2017

Starting Line: Remy Oval Track, Subic Freeport, Olongapo City

Finish Line: Barangay Lucap, Alaminos City (Pangasinan)

Cut-Off Time: 48 Hours

Number of Starters: 29 Runners

Number of Finishers: 28 Runners

Percentage of Finish: 96.5%

2017 West Coast Start

Group Picture @ Starting Area

RANK       NAME                  TIME (Hrs)

  1. Rolando Espina (Overall Champion & New Course Record) — 26:45:18
  2. Thomas Combisen (1st Runner-Up, Overall & New Course Record) — 29:08:58
  3. Ian Piza (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) —- 32:27:55
  4. Remedios Barcelo (Female Champion & New Female Course Record) — 35:13:45
  5. Badong Sietereales —– 35:40:55
  6. Rod Losabia —- 37:23:17
  7. Ryan Fabie —- 37:27:22
  8. Jonathan Moleta —- 38:01:23
  9. Frederick Peñelosa —- 39:08:36
  10. Aldrin Pallera —- 39:16:52
  11. Gibo Malvar —- 40:46:35
  12. Engelbert Pantig —- 41:00:41
  13. Tess Leono (1st Runner-Up, Female) —- 41:04:12
  14. Khris Calleon —- 41:52:17
  15. Gammy Tayao —- 43:41:13
  16. Richard Gano —- 44:29:10
  17. Jeff Velasco —- 46:21:39
  18. Vicente Zapanta —- 46:24:35
  19. Kathleen Piñero (2nd Runner-Up, Female) —- 46:27:25
  20. Laico Tolentino —- 46:28:54
  21. Isagani Zuñiga —- 47:11:58
  22. Elmar Casaway —- 47:15:41
  23. Tina Andaya (Female) —- 47:16:45
  24. Jonathan Baysa —- 47:16:45
  25. Avin Sauler —- 47:19:40
  26. Mick Teaño De Jesus —- 47:24:17
  27. Kerwin Ng —- 47:28:11
  28. Reese Rogel (Female) —- 47:36:50
2017 West Coast Champ

Overall Champion & New Course Record Holder Rolando Espina

2017 West Coast Female Champ

Female Champion & New Female Course Record Holder Remedies Barcelo

Congratulations To All The Finishers!

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Race Report: 2017 MILO Half-Marathon Qualifying Race/Tarlac City

25 08 2017

2017 MILO Half-Marathon (21K) Qualifying Race In Tarlac City/August 13, 2017

I was supposed to have an scheduled 5-hour LSD/Hike in the mountain trails on this day but I asked my Coach if I could join and qualify for the MILO Marathon Race to be held this coming December 2017 in a Half-Marathon Race to be held on a Sunday. My Coach gave his approval with the condition that I have the option to continue my hike later in the afternoon to complete the 5-hour LSD/Hike for the day. However, after the race, I decided to completely rest.

My OnLine Registration 10 days before the race did not push through as the Local Race Organizer could not open the e-mail that I sent to them. However, I was given the assurance that I would be allowed to join the race as long as I will be early at the Race Packet Pick-Up Booth on Race Day. Two hours before the start of the race, I was already at the site making some effort to be included in the list of qualifiers for the race. The local race organizer was very helpful to arrange with the MILO staff/personnel coming from Manila to have me included in the 21K race after accomplishing my registration form and submitting the required Medical/Doctor’s Certificate and MILO Pack.

Thirty minutes before the start of the race, I was already at the Runner’s Corral and behind all the runners as some runners would request for Photo-Ops with me. In between those requests, I would do some quick stretching on my legs and arms. Some runners whom I’ve known and joined in some of my PAU/BR’s Events’ Races would greet me and wish them luck in the race, in return.

The race started at exactly 4:30 AM after a short program—Singing of the National Anthem; A Prayer; A Greetings to all the Runners; and a Good Video on the Reminders for the Runners For Us to have an organized and problem-free race. As soon as the Starting Gun went-off, I started to brisk walk and positioned myself at the back of the pack. As soon as the road became more spacious for me, I started to run and tried to keep pace with those runners on my sides and on my front.

2017 MILO Half Marathon Tarlac 00

Focused & Determined To Qualify

I really wanted to run this race while observing my effort as based from my breathing and how high were my knees while I was running. The harder I could breath and the higher my knees are would indicate that I was forcing my pace really hard and with more speed. However, based from my training, I made my first 20 minutes of my run as my warm-up run which is I think within the Range of 6-7 effort with 10 as the Maximum Effort. After 20 minutes had lapsed, I started to have my tempo run which would last for 10 minutes (Effort Rate at 8-9) and then recover for 2-3 minutes at a Range of 6-7 effort. This kind of tempo run was repeated all throughout the race until I reached the turn-around point at 10.5K. I was surprised that my time was below one hour!

On my way back to the Finish Line, I started to run faster and tried 5-minute “strides” with 2-minute “recovery” run and then later reduced to 40-second “strides” with 20-second “recovery” run. I was happy that my time was sub-1:55-hour when I reached the 20-Km mark but suddenly, I felt a “cramping” sensation on my right calf that prevented me from maintaining my pace and be able to finish the race in less than 2 hours. The more I would keep my pace, the cramps would become more severe and painful that I could hardly lift my right leg. I decided to run slowly and walked later for a few meters and waited until the muscle/calf tightening was over. On the last kilometer to the finish line, I had my slowest pace in the race that almost all of the runners that I’ve passed in the last 2 kilometers had overtaken me.

2017 MILO Half Marathon Tarlac

Easy Pace On The Last 200 Meters To The Finish Line

No worries. I finished the race in 2:00:33 hours which is almost 15 minutes faster than my qualifying time for the age of 65-69 years old. Oh, well, my name is not listed in the published list of qualifiers in the MILO Tarlac City Leg but I know this will be corrected soon by the Race Organizer.

As a point of comparison and analysis of my performance in this race, I tried to look for my split times in last March’s Los Angeles Marathon where I registered a split time of 2:04:30 hours at Km 20 point and comparing it with my split time now of 1:54:++hours, it is clear that I’ve improved in my pace and speed for about 10 minutes for the said distance. Hopefully and at last, I will be able to attain my dream to try and find a race for me to qualify for the Boston Marathon. God willing!

On a personal note, this is the only race (for the past years) where I did not use a compression socks or calf sleeves. I’ve been running ultras with calf sleeves/compression socks and I never experienced any cramps on my calves and I personally believe that I should have used them on this race. With this experience, whether it will be a short race or an ultra running event, I will be using these compression socks and/or calf sleeves in my future races!

I will be happy to visit Cebu City this coming December 2017 to join in the 2017 MILO Marathon Finals.

Nutrition: One Power/Energy Bar Before The Race; One GU Gel on the last 4K; Water In Every Aid Station

Runner’s Kit: BROOKS Koi (Launch 4); Surge Socks; BROOKS Racer’s Shorts; Outdoor Avenues Track & Field Shorts; PAU Shirt; Garmin Forerunner 310XT; Trail Asia Buff; Adidas Adizero Cap.

(Note: I am a CTS Athlete)

 





The 3 Things That Separate Failure From Success In Ultrarunning

25 08 2017

Repost from the Blog of CTS (Carmichael Training System)/Jason Koop:

The 3 Things That Separate Failure From Success in Ultrarunning

We had a training blog ready to go for today, and then we got an email that changed everything:

Koop,

I’ve been dreaming of finishing Leadville for over thirty years and I’ve failed seven times. That’s right… seven times. But then I came across your book, hired CTS and was connected with John Fitzgerald. I entered the race this year knowing it would likely be my last attempt, no matter the outcome.

My day at Leadville started slow and I was chasing cutoffs even at Winfield. Had John not been at Winfield, I would have been practicing my hitchhiking skills. John greeted me with a smile, watched over me like a protective parent and was the most perfect pacer God ever created. For the next seventeen hours I was cranky, often despondent, and I tried to bail a few more times. All the while, John just kept feeding me calories and repeating over and over that we were “going to get this done.” He told me to believe in myself and finally around Turquoise Lake, I did.

John willed me to finish Leadville in under 30 hours. In doing so, I was able to keep a promise to my mother and fulfill a lifelong dream. Even more amazing: for a brief moment my preteen kids thought I was cool.

I’ll write a full report and circulate it to you in a few weeks. In the meantime, I had to drop you this note. I am not often at a loss for words but I am now. I am because of your book, all of CTS, and most of all because of the selfless act and inspiration of John Fitzgerald.

It was also great to spend time with Coach Corrine Malcolm and even see you and Adam St. Pierre on the backside of Hope Pass. I’m honored to be part of the CTS tribe.

Hope you and your team have a great time in a France and I look forward to jogging with you all again soon.

Cheers.
Jason Bousliman

We have the greatest job on earth. Like any job it comes with its frustrations and not every day is sunshine and roses, but on some days… On some days we get to witness athletes achieve more than they thought possible. On some days we get to watch an athlete cross a finish line he failed to reach seven times. Those are the golden days.

For those of you who have repeatedly failed to achieve your dream, we want you to know there is a path to success. When it comes to epic endurance challenges there are three components that make the difference between failing time after time and finally succeeding: Preparation, Belief, and Support.

PREPARATION

To succeed where you have previously failed you need to take an “all-in” approach to preparation. The time for half measures is over. Many times the reason athletes repeatedly fail is because their goals are so ambitious they stretch the limits of their physical capacity. That is often the very thing that makes those goals so enticing and fuels the passion to continue the pursuit. Never shrink from those goals.

In “Training Essentials for Ultrarunning”, Coach Jason Koop encouraged athletes to choose events they are emotionally invested in. Despite seven previous failures, Coach John Fitzgerald didn’t try to talk Jason Bousliman out of returning to Leadville. He didn’t suggest trying an ultra with less elevation gain or at a lower elevation. There are other events Jason could have finished without flirting with cutoffs, but Leadville was the event he was passionate about, and that emotional investment was crucial for the ability to go “all in” with preparation.

When everything has to go right in order for you to reach your goal, you have to train everything. This is where many athletes fall short. Superior fitness solves a lot of problems, but it’s not enough to just be fit. You also have to train your gut to handle a greater volume of food and fluids. You have to train your feet to handle the abuse of training and competition. You have to train toughness and the ability to cope with the unexpected and work through difficult problems. Sometimes the athlete who finally succeeds is no more fit than he or she was during all the failed attempts, but the successful athlete is always more prepared.

BELIEF

Coach Andy Jones-Wilkins gave an impassioned speech the night before the 2016 Western States Endurance Run, in which he told the many athletes before him that to reach the finish line they first had to stand on the start line with the unwavering belief they would finish. You go to the start knowing you’re going to finish. Not hoping to finish. Not trying to finish. Not playing it by ear. Start with the unwavering belief you will finish and you are already part of the way there.

Believing in yourself and that you will finish does not mean it will be easy or that you will not experience doubt or the desire to quit. But that underlying foundation of belief is necessary for getting through those rough patches. Belief in your preparation, in the work you’ve done, and the reason you are there are what build a foundation that won’t be washed away by a flood of doubt.

SUPPORT

Though its exact origin is unknown there is great truth to the proverb, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” The journey to the finish line of an ultramarathon is far longer than the race itself, and not even self-sufficient competitors (no crew, no pacers) can say they reach it alone.

Jason Bousliman made the 2017 Leadville 100 a family affair. Everyone was in on it. There was a team uniform and three generations of Bouslimans out at the aid stations. They were joined by CTS Coaches, including Jason Koop, Corrine Malcolm, and Adam St. Pierre. And then there was John Fitzgerald.

The role of a pacer is part pack mule, part counselor, part cheerleader, and part drill sergeant. In the back half of an ultramarathon athletes are on an emotional and nutritional roller coaster. Out in the darkness of the trail the baddest of bad asses sit down and cry, and when you fall to pieces the right pacer is essential for putting you back together. As such, the best pacer may not be the strongest runner, but rather the person you want by your side when you are your most vulnerable. Choose wisely. John Fitzgerald ran, walked, cajoled, and shepherded Jason Bousliman for 17 hours, not to claim his own Leadville buckle, but to see Jason earn his.

Jason Bousliman failed seven times. We have all failed at some point, and maybe several. But no number of past failures precludes you from future success. With Preparation, Belief, and Support, anything is possible.

(Note: I am a CTS Athlete





Official Result: 2nd Tagaytay To Naic 100K Ultra Marathon Race

7 08 2017

2nd Tagaytay To Naic 100K Ultra Marathon Race

10:00 PM August 5, 2017 to 6:00 PM August 6, 2017

Starting Line: Tagaytay Picnic Grove, Tagaytay City

Finish Line: Naic Public Plaza/Covered Court, Naic, Cavite

Cut-Off Time: 20 Hours (9 Hours @ Km 50/Nasugbu Poblacion (Jollibee)

Number of Starters: 23 Runners

Number of Finishers: 23 Runners

Percentage of Finish: 100%

Tagaytay To Naic Start

Group Picture @ Starting Line

RANK            NAME                    TIME (Hrs)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Overall Champion & New Course Record) —- 11:20:23
  2. Bong Dizon (1st Runner-Up, Overall) —- 13:31:05
  3. Doris Manguiat (Female Champion & Female New Course Record) —- 14:00:24
  4. Aldrin Pallera (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) —- 14:02:09
  5. Rod Losabia —- 14:25:02
  6. Mhel Biscarra —- 14:55:32
  7. Rolan Cera —- 15:29:14
  8. Remy Caasi (1st Runner-Up, Female) —- 15:31:39
  9. Tess Leono (2nd Runner-Up, Female) —- 15:58:20
  10. Rose Betonio (Female) —- 16:04:59
  11. Dondon Talosig —- 16:44:11
  12. Gibo Malvar —- 16:50:27
  13. Kris Caleon —- 16:50:28
  14. Marilou Ingua (Female) —- 16:50:29
  15. Glenn Rosales —- 17:23:31
  16. Olan Ortines —- 17:31:52
  17. Kathleen Piñero (Female) —- 18:14:10
  18. Jeremy Blas —- 18:28:33
  19. Domingo Pateño —- 18:32:34
  20. Margie Pailaga (Female) —-18:51:12
  21. Barney Mamaril —- 18:51:13
  22. JP Navarrete —- 19:18:15
  23. Miles Evangelista (Female) —- 19:46:22
Tagaytay To Naic Champion

Overall Champion & New Course Record Holder Thomas Combisen

Tagaytay To Naic Female Champ

Female Champion & Female Course Record Holder Doris Manguiat

Congratulations To All The Finishers!








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