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The 3 Things That Separate Failure From Success In Ultrarunning

25 08 2017

Repost from the Blog of CTS (Carmichael Training System)/Jason Koop:

The 3 Things That Separate Failure From Success in Ultrarunning

We had a training blog ready to go for today, and then we got an email that changed everything:

Koop,

I’ve been dreaming of finishing Leadville for over thirty years and I’ve failed seven times. That’s right… seven times. But then I came across your book, hired CTS and was connected with John Fitzgerald. I entered the race this year knowing it would likely be my last attempt, no matter the outcome.

My day at Leadville started slow and I was chasing cutoffs even at Winfield. Had John not been at Winfield, I would have been practicing my hitchhiking skills. John greeted me with a smile, watched over me like a protective parent and was the most perfect pacer God ever created. For the next seventeen hours I was cranky, often despondent, and I tried to bail a few more times. All the while, John just kept feeding me calories and repeating over and over that we were “going to get this done.” He told me to believe in myself and finally around Turquoise Lake, I did.

John willed me to finish Leadville in under 30 hours. In doing so, I was able to keep a promise to my mother and fulfill a lifelong dream. Even more amazing: for a brief moment my preteen kids thought I was cool.

I’ll write a full report and circulate it to you in a few weeks. In the meantime, I had to drop you this note. I am not often at a loss for words but I am now. I am because of your book, all of CTS, and most of all because of the selfless act and inspiration of John Fitzgerald.

It was also great to spend time with Coach Corrine Malcolm and even see you and Adam St. Pierre on the backside of Hope Pass. I’m honored to be part of the CTS tribe.

Hope you and your team have a great time in a France and I look forward to jogging with you all again soon.

Cheers.
Jason Bousliman

We have the greatest job on earth. Like any job it comes with its frustrations and not every day is sunshine and roses, but on some days… On some days we get to witness athletes achieve more than they thought possible. On some days we get to watch an athlete cross a finish line he failed to reach seven times. Those are the golden days.

For those of you who have repeatedly failed to achieve your dream, we want you to know there is a path to success. When it comes to epic endurance challenges there are three components that make the difference between failing time after time and finally succeeding: Preparation, Belief, and Support.

PREPARATION

To succeed where you have previously failed you need to take an “all-in” approach to preparation. The time for half measures is over. Many times the reason athletes repeatedly fail is because their goals are so ambitious they stretch the limits of their physical capacity. That is often the very thing that makes those goals so enticing and fuels the passion to continue the pursuit. Never shrink from those goals.

In “Training Essentials for Ultrarunning”, Coach Jason Koop encouraged athletes to choose events they are emotionally invested in. Despite seven previous failures, Coach John Fitzgerald didn’t try to talk Jason Bousliman out of returning to Leadville. He didn’t suggest trying an ultra with less elevation gain or at a lower elevation. There are other events Jason could have finished without flirting with cutoffs, but Leadville was the event he was passionate about, and that emotional investment was crucial for the ability to go “all in” with preparation.

When everything has to go right in order for you to reach your goal, you have to train everything. This is where many athletes fall short. Superior fitness solves a lot of problems, but it’s not enough to just be fit. You also have to train your gut to handle a greater volume of food and fluids. You have to train your feet to handle the abuse of training and competition. You have to train toughness and the ability to cope with the unexpected and work through difficult problems. Sometimes the athlete who finally succeeds is no more fit than he or she was during all the failed attempts, but the successful athlete is always more prepared.

BELIEF

Coach Andy Jones-Wilkins gave an impassioned speech the night before the 2016 Western States Endurance Run, in which he told the many athletes before him that to reach the finish line they first had to stand on the start line with the unwavering belief they would finish. You go to the start knowing you’re going to finish. Not hoping to finish. Not trying to finish. Not playing it by ear. Start with the unwavering belief you will finish and you are already part of the way there.

Believing in yourself and that you will finish does not mean it will be easy or that you will not experience doubt or the desire to quit. But that underlying foundation of belief is necessary for getting through those rough patches. Belief in your preparation, in the work you’ve done, and the reason you are there are what build a foundation that won’t be washed away by a flood of doubt.

SUPPORT

Though its exact origin is unknown there is great truth to the proverb, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” The journey to the finish line of an ultramarathon is far longer than the race itself, and not even self-sufficient competitors (no crew, no pacers) can say they reach it alone.

Jason Bousliman made the 2017 Leadville 100 a family affair. Everyone was in on it. There was a team uniform and three generations of Bouslimans out at the aid stations. They were joined by CTS Coaches, including Jason Koop, Corrine Malcolm, and Adam St. Pierre. And then there was John Fitzgerald.

The role of a pacer is part pack mule, part counselor, part cheerleader, and part drill sergeant. In the back half of an ultramarathon athletes are on an emotional and nutritional roller coaster. Out in the darkness of the trail the baddest of bad asses sit down and cry, and when you fall to pieces the right pacer is essential for putting you back together. As such, the best pacer may not be the strongest runner, but rather the person you want by your side when you are your most vulnerable. Choose wisely. John Fitzgerald ran, walked, cajoled, and shepherded Jason Bousliman for 17 hours, not to claim his own Leadville buckle, but to see Jason earn his.

Jason Bousliman failed seven times. We have all failed at some point, and maybe several. But no number of past failures precludes you from future success. With Preparation, Belief, and Support, anything is possible.

(Note: I am a CTS Athlete

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Official Result: 2nd Tagaytay To Naic 100K Ultra Marathon Race

7 08 2017

2nd Tagaytay To Naic 100K Ultra Marathon Race

10:00 PM August 5, 2017 to 6:00 PM August 6, 2017

Starting Line: Tagaytay Picnic Grove, Tagaytay City

Finish Line: Naic Public Plaza/Covered Court, Naic, Cavite

Cut-Off Time: 20 Hours (9 Hours @ Km 50/Nasugbu Poblacion (Jollibee)

Number of Starters: 23 Runners

Number of Finishers: 23 Runners

Percentage of Finish: 100%

Tagaytay To Naic Start

Group Picture @ Starting Line

RANK            NAME                    TIME (Hrs)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Overall Champion & New Course Record) —- 11:20:23
  2. Bong Dizon (1st Runner-Up, Overall) —- 13:31:05
  3. Doris Manguiat (Female Champion & Female New Course Record) —- 14:00:24
  4. Aldrin Pallera (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) —- 14:02:09
  5. Rod Losabia —- 14:25:02
  6. Mhel Biscarra —- 14:55:32
  7. Rolan Cera —- 15:29:14
  8. Remy Caasi (1st Runner-Up, Female) —- 15:31:39
  9. Tess Leono (2nd Runner-Up, Female) —- 15:58:20
  10. Rose Betonio (Female) —- 16:04:59
  11. Dondon Talosig —- 16:44:11
  12. Gibo Malvar —- 16:50:27
  13. Kris Caleon —- 16:50:28
  14. Marilou Ingua (Female) —- 16:50:29
  15. Glenn Rosales —- 17:23:31
  16. Olan Ortines —- 17:31:52
  17. Kathleen Piñero (Female) —- 18:14:10
  18. Jeremy Blas —- 18:28:33
  19. Domingo Pateño —- 18:32:34
  20. Margie Pailaga (Female) —-18:51:12
  21. Barney Mamaril —- 18:51:13
  22. JP Navarrete —- 19:18:15
  23. Miles Evangelista (Female) —- 19:46:22
Tagaytay To Naic Champion

Overall Champion & New Course Record Holder Thomas Combisen

Tagaytay To Naic Female Champ

Female Champion & Female Course Record Holder Doris Manguiat

Congratulations To All The Finishers!





Podium Finishers: 70th Edition of the Mt Fuji Mountain Race (July 28, 2017)

31 07 2017

Repost From Japan Running News:

New Champs Crowned as Gorotani and Yoshizumi Win Fuji Mountain Race Titles

Celebrating its 70th running this year, the Fuji Mountain Race took place on Friday, July 28. As in past years, the first 10.8 km from Fujiyoshida City Hall at 770 m elevation to Umagaeshi at 1450 m was a gentle climb on paved roads. From Umageshi runners enter trails, and for the kilometer from Hanagoya at the 7th Station all the way to the 8th Station it becomes a very difficult 40-degree incline climb. After that runners pass through an area of rough volcanic rocks as they approach Mt. Fuji’s summit. Peaking out with a net elevation difference of 3000 m, the 21 km Summit Course continues to gain a reputation as Japan’s premier mountain race. Last year bad weather forced the race to be stopped at Mt. Fuji’s 5th Station, meaning that this year’s race would be the first time in two years that  runners would finish at the peak.

In this year’s 70th running, former Hakone Ekiden uphill Fifth Stage standout Shun Gorotani (Comody Iida) won in 2:31:34, an excellent time just 3:53 off the course record. In the women’s race, world-class Sky Running Vertical Kilometer runner Yuri Yoshizumi won in 3:01:17, the fastest women’s winning time since 1988. Both won in their first attempts at the Summit Course.

Men’s winner Gorotani is just 24. As part of Toyo University‘s ekiden team he ran the Hakone Ekiden twice, finishing an outstanding 3rd on the uphill Fifth Stage in 2016 behind stage winner Daichi Kamino (Aoyama Gakuin University). Gorotani now runs for the Comody Iida corporate ekiden team. Last year he won the Fuji Mountain Race 5th Station short course, breaking the course record by a wide margin. Having qualified for the Summit Course, Gorotani returned to live up to expectations with another superlative win. Taking control of the race early, Gorotani opened up a lead of 14 minutes over 2nd-placer Satoshi Kato, yet another runner-up finish for Kato. Gorotani was misdirected by course marshals very early in the race, but officials judged the error to have had no impact on his result.

Women’s winner Yoshizumi began running as an amateur after she began working full-time, winning the 2013 Hokkaido Marathon in a PB 2:37:56. Changing her focus to trail running in 2015, Yoshizumi won the 2016 Sky Running Japan Series’ Vertical Kilometer Series title. In December last year she won the Sky Running Asian Championships MSIG Lantau Vertical Kilometer, and in May this year she won the Vertical Kilometer World Circuit’s Transvulcania Vertical Kilometer against Europe’s best athletes. Outside of the Vertical Kilometer, she finished 13th in last year’s IAU Trail World Championships Trans Peneda Geres 85 km, competing at the world level from her home base in Osaka. Like Gorotani, she won the Fuji Mountain Race 5th Station Course last year before coming back to win the Summit Course this year, finishing 9th overall.

Source article:
http://dogsorcaravan.com/2017/07/28/fuji-mountain-race-2017-result/
translated by Brett Larner
all photos © 2017 Koichi Iwasa, DogsorCaravan, all rights reserved





Official Result: 7th Fort Magsaysay To Dingalan 65K Ultra Marathon Race (FM2D 65)

25 07 2017

7th Fort Magsaysay To Dingalan 65K Ultra Marathon Race (FM2D 65K)

Start Time/Place: 4:00 AM July 23, 2017/Headquarters 7th Infantry Division, Philippine Army, Fort Magsaysay, Palayan City

Finish/Cut-Off Time/Place: 4:00 PM July 23, 2017/Sea Side Resto, Sitio Tanguigue, Barangay Aplaya, Dingalan, Aurora

Cut-Off Time: 12 Hours

Number Of Starters: 17 Runners

Number Of Finishers: 15 Runners

Percentage Of Finish: 88.23%

2017 FM2D Start

Group Picture @ Starting Area

RANK             NAME                TIME (Hrs)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Champion, Overall & Course Record) — 6:44:43
  2. Gibo Malvar (1st Runner-Up, Overall) — 8:04:54
  3. Dondon Talosig (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) — 8:13:12
  4. Kris Caleon ———– 8:15:22
  5. Rod Losabia ———- 9:13:45
  6. Glenn Rosales ——- 9:19:40
  7. Tess Leono (Champion, Female) —– 9:22:18
  8. Englebert Pantig ——- 9:24:40
  9. Kathleen Piñero (1st Runner-Up, Female) —- 9:26:50
  10. Peach Tamayo (2nd Runner-Up, Female) —- 10:49:59
  11. Richard Gy ————— 10:55:59
  12. JP Navarete ————– 11:01:39
  13. Anna Odessa Albaracin (Female) —- 11:16:33
  14. Mark Belaniso ———- 11:34:25
  15. Avin Sauler ———- 11:57:30
2017 FM2D Thomas Combisen

Overall Champion & Course Record Holder Thomas Combisen

2017 FM2D Tess Leono

Female Champion Tess Leono

Congratulations To All The Finishers!





Official Result: 7th PAU’s Tanay 50K Ultra Marathon Race

17 07 2017

2017/7th PAU’s Tanay 50K Ultra Marathon Race (Road)

Starting Area: Intersection Sampaloc Road & Manila East Highway, Tanay, Rizal

Start Time: 4:00 AM July 16, 2017 (Sunday)

Finish Area: Sierra Madre Hotel & Resort, Marikina-Infanta Highway, Tanay, Rizal

Finish Time: 1:00 PM July 16, 2017 (Sunday)

Cut-Off Time: 9 Hours

Number Of Starters: 31 Runners

Number Of Finishers: 30 Runners

Percentage Of Finish: 96.7%

2017 Tanay 50 02

Group Picture @ Starting Line

RANK              NAME                          TIME (Hours)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Champion, Overall) —– 5:03:06
  2. Frederick Peñalosa (1st Runner-Up, Overall) —- 6:07:06
  3. Mhel Biscarra (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) —- 6:15:45
  4. Aldrin Pallera ———————– 6:35:16
  5. Rod Losabia ————————- 6:37:19
  6. Remy Caasi (Champion, Female) ———– 6:37:39
  7. Gammy Tayao ———————- 6:39:07
  8. Almar Danguilan —————– 6:49:17
  9. Hope Brazil ————————- 6:51:34
  10. Bryan Taroma ——————— 6:56:25
  11. Kharl Ocampo ——————— 6:56:44
  12. Emerson Sto. Domingo ——– 6:56:50
  13. Gibo Malvar ———————— 6:58:57
  14. Dondon Talosig ——————- 6:59:37
  15. Kathleen Piñero (1st Runner-Up, Female) ——- 7:01:16
  16. Rolan Cera ————————– 7:22:12
  17. Michael Peralta —————— 7:24:42
  18. JP Navarette ———————– 7:33:46
  19. Emma Libunao (2nd Runner-Up, Female) ——– 7:40:01
  20. Marlon Santos ——————– 7:40:27
  21. Glenn Rosales ——————— 7:40:38
  22. Ronnel Go ————————– 7:49:36
  23. Glenn Adviento —————— 8:04:21
  24. Rona Saludes (Female) ——- 8:04:23
  25. Hermie Saludes —————– 8:04:26
  26. Jonas Olandria —————— 8:11:13
  27. Jonathan Moleta ————— 8:13:29
  28. Bernadette Schlester (Female) ——————- 8:15:59
  29. Arnold Pagaran —————- 8:24:29
  30. Reese Rogel (Female) ————- 8:59:48

   ***Jovie Narcise/RD ——————– 6:57:56

Thomas Combisen Tanay

Thomas Combisen, Overall Champion

Remy Caasi Tanay

Remy Caasi, Female Champion

Congratulations To All The Finishers! See you next year!

2017 Tanay 50 03

Scenery/View Along The Route

(Note: Pictures By Dmitri Conag Navarro & Remy Caasi on Facebook)





2nd Week Of Training: Mt Fuji Mountain Race

30 06 2017

June 19-25, 2017

June 19, Monday, was a well-deserved REST Day for me after my weekend “back-to-back” training runs which culminated in a 10.5 mile recon run in Palayan City, Nueva Ecija & Fort Magsaysay. The heat of the sun on those exposed single-track trail put a lot of exhaustion and fatigue to my body system. I usually have a complete rest on this day by eating and having more time to sleep on Sunday and Monday evenings.

This week will be my first full week of training from Monday up to Sunday. On Tuesday, the training schedule was for me to do a 1:30-hour Endurance Run on a trail and I selected my Backyard’s Loop #2 Trail as my course. This course is what I fondly called as the “Brown Mountain” course which is a wide-dirt road and eventually turns into a single-track trail to the foot/peak of Mt Quadrante and Mt Tambong/Mt Maniwalan. I was able to cover a distance of 7.17 miles for 1:31+hours with an average speed of 12:42 minutes per mile. I observed that my run was very comfortable because of the cooler air as I started my run very early in the morning, before the sun rises.

On Wednesday, I had my first “hill repeats” or Interval Training workout. The total time for this workout, to include the warm-up run; hill repeats & rest between interval; and the cool-down run, would result to 1:30 hours. I did my “hill repeats” in a place where the housing subdivision was discontinued and the place was all mine in the early morning as there were no people in the area. It was my first time to feel the shortness of breath and the feeling of being dizzy as if I am going to have a “heart stroke” after I did my 4th repetition. I have to adjust my pace but I tried my best to push harder as I reach the highest elevation/end of my hill repeats in every repetition. I have to bring up my knees higher; swing my arms faster and wider; and breath as hard as I can. The total distance that I covered was 6.78 miles but I felt that I was able to force my heart and lungs to a higher level of exertion than I had before!

2nd Week Mt Fuji Training 00

Endurance Runs @ Backyard’s Loop #2 (Mt Tambo/Maniwalan At The Background)

On Thursday, I had my Recovery Run/Easy Run for one hour where I covered a distance of 5.20 miles. This was done on a paved road where the first half was slightly going uphill and then back to where I started.

On Friday, it was another 1:30-hour Endurance Run which I decided to have at the same course that I did last Tuesday (at my Backyard’s Loop #2). The same as of Tuesday’s run, I have to run up to the mountain for 45-46 minutes and then turn-around towards the starting line for the second-half of my workout. To my surprise, I was ahead or faster by 2:30 minutes when I reached the turn-around point during my run last Tuesday and I just continued my run for more elevation gain for the rest of my time before turning around for my last 45 minutes back to where I started. I was able to cover a distance of 7.63 miles on this workout!

On Saturday, I had my second “hill repeats” session, the same session/workout that I had last Wednesday but the total number of hours for this workout is 2:30 hours. Since it was the schedule of one of my PAU races (Mariveles To Bagac 50K Ultra Run), I have to think of a way where I can insert my training workout while I am supervising this race. Instead of “hill repeats” of going up the hill and then back down the hill, I improvised my “hill repeats” by continuously going up towards the peak or highest point of the course. So, I brought my vehicle to the highest point of the course, parked it, and then I started my warm-up run by going down the mountain for 40 minutes on an easy pace. From the point where I made my turn-around, I returned up to the mountain doing my “hill repeats”. After 1:20 hours, I continued my run and tried to catch up with the runners of my race. After 2:30 hours I was able to cover a distance of 13 miles. Since the road was not as steep as my “hill repeats” on Wednesday, I felt I did not push too hard and felt that I was still strong after the desired number of hours of my workout for the day had elapsed.

On Sunday, the goal was to practice running and hiking on a higher elevation gain for 4 hours which is a good equivalent of “double-traverse” to my Backyard’s Loop #3 (Mt Roosevelt Traverse). It was also a workout to train for my hydration and nutritional needs in longer runs with more elevation gain. I was in the company of PAU runners who just finished in the previous day’s 50K run! We had some rests and “pit stops” along the route but we were able to make it in 5 hours for a total distance of 13.3 miles. It was nice to be back on this course which I missed for the past 4 weeks. We had some delays on our uphill climb due to the growing tall grasses and plants that partly cover the trail. On our way back for our 2nd traverse, the sun was already hot as most of the trail is exposed to the sun. We slowed down due to the heat and I had to submerge myself to a flowing stream, 3 miles before the finish line! We ingested some solid foods and soda drinks at the turn-around point (Mile 6.6).

2nd Week Mt Fuji Training 01

At The Peak Of Mt Roosevelt With PAU Runners

Everyday, I have to force myself to sleep 8-9 hours every night and after my “hill repeats” sessions, I had to take a nap in the afternoon for some rest. My nutrition intake for the week consists of ordinary Filipino foods and fruits.

The following are the totals for this week:

Total Duration (Time): 13:40 Hours

Total Distance: 52.8 Miles/84.48 Kilometers

Total Elevation Gain: 21,795 Feet

Elevation Gain Per Mile: 412.78 Feet

Lace up and go run!





Team PAU @ 2017 IAU 24-Hour World Championships

28 06 2017

Team PAU Belfast 06

Official Banner Of The Event

A team of runners representing the Philippine Association of Ultrarunners (PAU), the National Sports Federation of Ultrarunning in the Philippines, will be joining the 12th edition of the International Association of Ultrarunner’s (IAU) 24-Hour World Championships to be held in Belfast, Ireland on July 1-2, 2017. The team is composed of three (3) male runners and one (1) lady runner who are residing in Ireland and the Great Britain. This will be the first time that the Philippines will be represented, through PAU, in this yearly prestigious ultra marathon event which is worldwide in scope and attendance. Each team is duly screened by the International Association of Ultrarunners (IAU) prior to their participation in this event. Without the endorsement of PAU and the other countries’ Ultramarathon Federations, anybody could not join and participate in this event.

Team PAU Belfast 04

Official Logo Of The Event

The Team is led by its Team Captain, Rolando Espina, who is the First Filipino to have finished the Spartathlon Ultramarathon last year in Athens, Greece. He is also the Overall Champion in this year’s edition of the Bataan Death March 102K (BDM 102) Ultramarathon Race held last January. Rex Brillantes  won the Overall Champion in this month’s Donadea 100K Ultramarathon Race held in Donadea Forest Park in Ireland with a time of 8:45:54 hours. Jivee Tolentino is also a fast ultra marathoner who just finished 6th Overall in this month’s Portumna Forest 100K Ultramarathon Race in Galway, Ireland with a time of 9:53:16 hours. Rolando Espina finished Overall 1st Runner-Up in this race with a time of 8:36:24 hours. All of these ultra runners are also seasoned triathletes.

Team PAU Belfast 01

Rolando Espina

Team PAU Belfast 02

Rex Brillantes

Team PAU Belfast 03

Jivee Tolentino

Due to some legalities and some paperworks to be done, only one Filipino Lady runner is qualified to join the team. She is Mylene Elliot, who is a “back-to-back” Finisher of the Comrades Ultra Marathon in South Africa (Up & Down Courses for 2015 and 2016 editions, respectively), and a resident of Great Britain. She finished her 2017 Virgin Money London Marathon with a time of 4:43:05 hours.

The Team PAU-Belfast will be supported by the following members of the Team’s Support Crew: Fermina Mermeto; Pete Elliot; Amado Damot; Blanche Damot; and Eugene Brillantes.

Team PAU Belfast 05

Mylene Elliot

The current National Record for the 24-Hour Endurance Run was set and under the belt of Thomas Combisen who finished eight overall among 27 international runners in last year’s IAU Asia & Oceania 24-Hour Endurance Run held in Kaohsiung, Taiwan last November 19-20, 2016 with a total distance of 203.45 kilometers covered during the duration of 24 hours of continuous running. With a milder temperature and cooler weather in Belfast, Ireland plus the fact that the team members now are more exposed to international ultra marathon events, it is expected that a new National Record for the 24-Hour Run will be set and recorded in this event.

The members of the team are excited to represent the Philippines as this world’s event is being held within their “backyard”, so to speak, and for the fact that they had been preparing for this event for almost one year since the IAU have selected the City of Belfast as the venue and knowing that Athletics Ireland & British Athletics are the Local Organizing Committee (LOC) of this event.

The IAU 24-Hour World Championships is an annual international 24-hour competition among Teams coming from the National Sports Federation of Ultrarunning in IAU-sanctioned member-countries which has now a membership of 82 countries. The IAU World Championship Record for the 24-Hour Endurance Run is held by Michael Morton of the United States in 2012 with a distance of 277.543 kilometers and for the Women’s Record was set by Mami Kudo of Japan in 2013 with a total distance covered of 252.205 kilometers.

As the President of the Philippine Association of Ultrarunners, I was able to send some congratulatory message to represent the country in a high-level and world-stage running competition, as well as advise, to the members of the Team PAU. I told them, “Don’t be intimidated with the presence of the “superstars” in ultra running in the world. You are not there to compete with them but rather to experience and enjoy those 24 hours running with them. Just maintain your pace and believe in the training that you put into this race. For me, you are already winners as being the first Team PAU to represent the country in an IAU World 24-Hour Championship Event.”

Among the international running “superstars” and elite ultra runners, Pete Kostelnick of the USA will be competing in this event. He is the present Course Record Holder of the Badwater Ultramarathon in 21:56:32 hours; Fastest Man to Run Across America in 42 days, 6 hours, and 30 minutes; and 5th fastest North American, all-time record of 163.5 miles (261.6 kilometers) covered in a 24-hour endurance run.

Let us give cheers and send good vibes to the members of the Team PAU to this event.

Mabuhay Ang Pilipinas!

pau-iau-logo

Official Logos Of PAU & IAU

 

 








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