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2018 TNF Lavaredo 120K Experience (Part 6)

3 07 2018

2018 TNF Lavaredo 120K Experience (Part 6)

Post Evaluation: TNF 120K Ultra Trail Race

What Went Right?

  1. Clothing & Gear: I think I used the best clothing gear, from trail shoes to my headlamp lighting system. My “layering” of my upper garment was perfect with a sleeveless Uniqlo shirt inside my Red PAU short-sleeved shirt with my Patagonia “Houdini” Windbreaker Light Jacket. I feel warm with my MIUT Buff/neck Gaiters; Compressport Headband and Salomon Running Cap. I had Giro Cycling Gloves with my LEKI Carbon Trekking Poles. My Salomon Speedcross 4 was perfect for the trail in Lavaredo which I used for two months in my training leading to the event. I was using a Salomon EXO Twinskin Short (Red) which was light, comfortable, and provided me with warm feeling during the night run.
  2. Salomon 5L Sense Ultra Hydration Vest & Pulse Belt: My Salomon Vest carried all the Mandatory Gear and Nutrition Needs for the whole course/event as I opted not to have any Drop Bag at Km 66/Cimabanche Aid Station. My Salomon Pulse Belt was perfect for my Trekking Poles; additional nutrition (Skyflakes) and Cellphone.
  3. Training: My “mountain and hill repeats” were very effective for the uphills and downhill runs for short duration/distance along the course.
  4. Nutrition & Hydration: I only have 5 pieces of Power Gels for emergency situation; 6 pieces of KIND Power Bar; 4 packs of SkyFlakes Crackers (Condensada); NUUN tablets: and two pieces of empty Ziplock.
  5. Pacing & Average Speed During The Race: I have a lot of lessons learned from my early DNF at MIUT in Madeira, Portugal. I needed to be very light during the race and trained for heavy loads (3 Liters of Water + Food) in my daily long runs in my Playground. I was satisfied with my average speed/pacing during my run at the TNF Lavaredo until I was slowed down with dizziness and pain on my knees.

Salomon S-Lab Sense Ultra 5 Liters

What Did I Do To Make It Right?

My frustration in MIUT last April gave me a lot of lesson learned and I was able to adjust things during my training. My early arrival in Cortina gave me the time to adjust with the weather and the altitude. However, I should have visited Tri Cime and other higher elevations of the course by Bus but with my lack of knowledge of the area, I was limited in trying to find the first and last few kilometers of the course. My CTS Coach John Fitzgerald sent me his last guidance with the gist/bottomline of focusing on the things that I could control during the race (nutrition, pacing, and mindset) with hiking with purpose and positive attitude. I learned a lot of variations on how to use the trekking poles during my training leading to this race. I really wanted to hike the uphills more efficiently with the trekking poles. I had more “push-ups” repetitions during my training days in order to make my shoulders stronger than what I had during MIUT.

Bringing lesser gels, bars, drink mix, and lighter mandatory gear (Salomon Bonatti Waterproof Jacket & Pants and Columbia Long-Sleeved Shirt) made my weight lighter during the run. I also carried lesser volume of water from the start to lighten my load but also carried an extra collapsible Salomon Foldable Bottle just in case I needed more water during the hotter part of the day.

After hiking the uphills, I would run at an easy pace on flatter and downhill portions of the course which gave me enough time to reach the First Cut-Off Time Checkpoint and put in more buffer time at the Check Point in Rifugio Di Auronzo.

Bring at least two empty Ziplocks in your pocket (easily accessible) for obvious reason.

Last Message Of My CTS Coach

What was NOT quite right during the race?

I opted to run the downhills on the early part of the course without using my trekking poles, most specially, on the seemingly flatter sections but they are actually gradual descents. I was thinking that I would be faster in running the downhills by not using the trekking poles but I was wrong. If only I have used my trekking poles on all the descents, I could have saved my quads and my knees from having pain even if I was slower by a few minutes. My old knees and legs need some cushioning when running the descents to preserve them for the last half of the course which has more descents.

I should have started to ingest my solid food on the start of the uphill climb from Lake Misurina to Rifugio Di Auronzo while on the move and not at the middle of the climb with a 3-5 minutes short stop and rest.

I should have NOT stayed so long at the Aid Station in Rifugio Di Auronzo and spent a lot of time sitting and talking with the Indonesian guy. I should have limited my stay there by simply eating the soup pasta, drinking my Coca Cola, and refilling my bottles while I was standing. I could have shaved at least 10-12 minutes of my stay here.

I really could not understand why I did not take the risk of taking some Aleve tablets to relieve the pain on my knees after the first switchback from Tri Cime/Peak of Lavaredo. I usually take these pain relievers on the middle of my race just to anticipate the pain on my knees which was very effective in solving the situation I am in in my past finishes.

At The Peak Of Lavaredo

What is the best-case scenario?

1. With a buffer time of 40+ minutes from Rifugio Di Auronzo, I should have maintained it up to the next Cut-Off Time Checkpoint in Cimabanche and gambled any remaining buffer time in every Checkpoint up to the last Cut-Off Time Checkpoint before the Finish Line.

2. I could have used my trekking poles more on the downhill/descents to save my knees/legs and be able to hike relentlessly with purpose up to the Finish Line. The time that made me faster to run or hike on the flatter and downhill sections without the trekking poles was nothing if I could have saved my legs and knees and be able to pass the Cut-Off Time Checkpoints.

3. From the start, one bottle of water/electrolyte mix (500 ml) is enough up to Km 33 to make my load lighter from midnight up to early morning due to the colder air/weather. One bottle filled with liquid in one bottle and another 1/2 bottle of liquid, totaling to 750 ml is needed from Km 33 up to the Aid Station in Rifugio Di Auronzo (Km 50). Carrying just the right amount of water on my vest could significantly reduce the weight I was carrying. Which translates to lighter load to my knees and legs.

What steps can you take to improve?

1. More strengthening exercises to my leg muscles. More push-ups and core exercises for my upper body.

2. More time to train for very LONG downhill running or hiking with the use of trekking poles. Downhill running/hiking distance should be at least 10 up to 20 kilometers straight down, whether they are steep and technical or not. (Note: Never stop using the trekking poles once they are deployed; in uphills, flats, and the downhills.)

3. More Mountain Downhill Repeats! Simply, the reverse of Hill/Mountain Repeats where one has to run or hike the downhill faster than going up to the mountain. This time, using my trekking poles!

4. Bring a lot of BUFF. One for the Ear Cover; one for the Mouth & Nose for the absorption of fluids due to “running nose”; and one for the neck. In addition, I can bring an extra BUFF to be looped on my wrist just in case I need a cloth to absorb some cold water from the streams to douse my head and neck during hotter part of the day.

5. If I have the time, I could have visited/recon by Bus or Car the highest peak or highest location along the course in order to acclimatize or take a brief hike.

The Intense Look @ The Dolomites

To be continued…

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Key Lessons On Ultrarunning From Ann Trason

2 10 2015

If you don’t know Ann Trason, then you are not an Ultrarunner. Before you type her name on Google, I would like to briefly mention that she was the Lady Champion of the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run for 14 times after failing to finish the race on her first two attempts. She has also broken twenty (20) World Records On Ultrarunning during her career.

She is now a Running Coach of a Middle School in Berkeley, California; coach for a High School Track Team; a Race Director; and an On Line Ultrarunning Coach. She is also a columnist/writer for the Ultrarunning Magazine where this post was taken/copied. The following is the complete copy of the “Ask Ann” Column in the said magazine.

Ann Trason

Ann Trason

Dear Ann,
Now that you’re a coach, are there some, key lessons you pass down from your own coaches?
—Michael

Dear Michael,

I have always loved being a student of the sport—reading, asking questions, trying new things and learning what worked for me. I have been fortunate to have had several coaches who helped fill in gaps in the complex puzzle we call ultrarunning. Your question gets me thinking about the one who did the most to make me the runner and coach I am. Here are 17 lessons I learned from my favorite coach.

Consistency My coach made sure I would get out and do something every day, every week, every month, year after year. Sometimes a lot, sometimes just a little, occasionally fast, often very slow. Consistent training yields consistent racing.

Smile Happiness is infectious. She taught me that no matter how tough the day, there is always something to smile about. How can I mope about something going wrong when it makes such a great story to tell my friends?!

Passion I learned that a good coach must be as passionate as her runner. She made it obvious that she shared my passion for running.

Adaptability I always admired her instinctive ability to accept and instantly adapt as situations changed. We all have that ability buried inside us. I’ve worked hard to let it out.

Running is play, not work I have no idea how many miles I’ve run in my career. I can thank my coach for that. She viewed running as a chance to play. For her, there was no focus on checking the pace, tracking the miles, counting the hills. A good run was being out there having fun.

Positive attitude My coach never scolded me, never barked orders. She did give me a sly look occasionally when I did something wrong, but it was always to encourage me to do something better.

Relax let yourself run free. My coach had a naturally beautiful running form. Just watching her glide along, no tension, no unnecessary motion, made me a better runner.

Keep it simple My coach was always about simplicity. She was not into fancy gear. It was simple running.

Don’t overthink things She taught me to never overthink my running.

A steady trot is the fastest way to cover ground I’ve never been the fastest runner, nor the most talented. My coach helped me learn to run steady, mile after mile, never worrying about the other runners or the terrain ahead.

Enjoy the journey For my coach, it was always about the journey, not the destination.

Explore new places My coach made sure we searched for new trails, trotted across green meadows and bounded up hills just because they were there.

Stop to sniff the flowers My coach taught me to look around, smell the fresh air and feel the breeze blowing my hair. No matter how long or hard a run I had scheduled, there was always time to take in the unexpected view.

Get wet Every stream, every lake is a chance to refresh yourself with a quick dip.

Enjoy the moment There are times in life when we need to run long and hard. There are other times when the best thing to do is sit quietly at the edge of a meadow. In either case, enjoy the moment.

Passing the torch Seeing her love of running increased my desire to give back to the sport by mentoring and coaching others.

Unleash your potential There are times to hold back, but there comes the moment when you need to take off the leash and let yourself run free.





1st Mt Natib 50K Trail Run (FKT)

25 04 2014

For the past nine (9) months, I have considered this trail route from Roosevelt National Park in Dinalupihan, Bataan up to the peak of Mt Natib as a personal obsession to explore an all-trail route as a part of my training playground. I can personally call this the Mt Natib’s North Trail Route.

After the PNOC made some testing and exploration up to the peak of Mt Natib in the ’80s in order to discover geothermal energy source in the Bataan Natural Park, the government left a dirt road and some gravel road from the Roman Highway in Orani, Bataan up to Barangay Tala and then further up to the base camp (Camp 06) before the final assault to the peak of Mt Natib. Through the years, the road from the highway to Barangay Tala was paved/cemented as part of the development in the area. What was left was a 7-kilometer trail/dirt road from the trailhead to the peak of Mt Natib. This is the traditional and well-known route for hikers and mountaineers who would like to camp and visit the peak of the said mountain. I personally call it the South Approach to Mt Natib.

I’ve used this traditional route for two times: first, when I went to peak bag Mt Natib with escorts from the Philippine Army; and second, when I brought some of my ultra running friends to conduct an “Operation Linis” to collect the trashes left by visitors and campers at the peak of the mountain and the trail that leads to it. It was a successful event wherein I tied up the effort with the Philippine Army operating in the area.

Fast forward. After two years since my last visit to the mountain, I’ve started to concentrate more of my running workouts/training in trail running. It was in July last year (2013) when I started trying to explore the possibility of coming up with a trail route coming from my first playground area from the North Approach going to the peak of Mt Natib. And it was only in November of last year that I was able to trace the trail that connects to the place called “Binutas”, considered as the Gateway To Natib.

The distance is measured, through my Garmin Watch, as 20.7 kilometers from the place I started my trek up to Binutas, from an elevation of 40 MASL to 900 MASL , with a Total Elevation Gain of 8,000 feet. From Binutas up to the peak of Mt Natib has a distance of 5 Kilometers with a Total Elevation Gain of 1,500 feet.

I would make the trail course from the trailhead up to “Binutas” as my long trek on weekends (at least, once a month) and named this course as my “Playground Bravo”. With a “pit stop” in my friend’s place, Weeler Orogo, on my way up to “Binutas” and then going down to where I’ve started, I would register 11-12 hours workout in the mountain. I would bring my lunch and some bite foods in my pack and would have our resupply of water at Weeler’s place and at Barangay Mabiga.

I came up with an Event Page on Facebook about a trail running event which I dubbed as the “Playground BRAVO” 50K Trail Run (1st Mt Natib 50K Trail Run) but I made sure that only those who are well-seasoned trail runners are accepted to join the event. The final requirement to join this race was my personal knowledge on the capability of the participant. I really did not care if I had ONLY ONE participant for the event. What was important was the fact that a proof that this trail route is doable and find out whatever feedback (positive or negative) I could gather from the participants.

My Ever Loyal "Usual Suspects" In My Races

My Ever Loyal “Usual Suspects” In My Races

Four runners registered for the event with a registration fee of P 900.00 for each runner. I came up with three (3) water resupply points, to include an Aid Station at “Binutas” where Jollibee packed lunch was available to the runners with Soda, Gatorade, Ice Candies (Joy-Joy), Ensaymada, Hard Boiled Eggs, and Rice Cake.

Aid Station (Vehicle) @ "Binutas"

Aid Station (Vehicle) @ “Binutas”

After serving the participants with coffee and full breakfast, the race started at exactly 5:30 AM with four (4) participants, 3 males and 1 female.

To ensure safety and confidence to the runners, I provided a “pacer/guide” for the leading runner/s and a “safety marshal” for the last runner. I also gave specific instructions to the runners to be extra careful and deliberate in their footing and trekking on the final assault and descent to and from the peak of Mt Natib as there will be “rappelling” portions to be done on the rocks towards the peak.

As the race progressed through the day, the first 3 runners with the “guide/pacer” arrived at the “Binutas” area in 6:00 hours, to include a 40-minute “pit stop” at Weeler Orogo’s place as the group waited for the last runner. The last runner with the safety marshal arrived after two hours and I advised the runner not to proceed to the peak anymore. For the safety of the runner, I declared the runner as DNF.

Three Runners With Guide Arriving @ "Binutas"

Three Runners With Guide Arriving @ “Binutas”

After nine (9) hours, the three (3) runners with their guide arrived at “Binutas” after coming from the peak of Mt Natib. They were still strong and determined to finish the race. Their last 20 kilometers were all downhill with about 3-4 kilometers of uphill and I would expect them to be arriving at the Finish Area at nighttime!

The following is the Official Result of the 1st Mt Natib 50K Trail Run:

RANK       RACE BIB #               NAME                                             TIME (Hours)

1                      160             Ronnel Go (Champion)                              13:44:45

2                        1                Graciano Santos (1st Runner-Up)        13:45:23

3                        8                Jon Borbon (2nd Runner-Up)               13:52:50

Aside from the “forest” section of the course which is 2-3 kilometers before reaching “Binutas” where the participants encountered sharp blade of grasses, thick vegetation along the trail and thorny vines and plants on each side of the trail, the trail could be runnable or could be negotiated with faster hiking speed.

The finishers told me that they hiked the whole course except for the downhill portions on their way back to the finish line. They were fully satisfied that they have finished a very challenging trail course. One of the runners had also strongly suggested that I could submit the course as a UTMB qualifier. However, unanimously, all the tree runners would like to return to do another race event on the same course for them to improve their finish times. But they suggested that trail course is not really for “first-timer” trail runners.

Included in their post-race dinner/buffet is a Finisher’s T-Shirt and Podium Trophy for each of the Finishers.

Personally, I consider the trail event as a success even with only 4 starters with 3 as finishers. I was able to prove that with a seasoned trail runner, the North Trail to the peak of Mt Natib is doable and runnable. I would be happy if I will have at least ten (10) runners for the next edition of this event.

Officially, this is the First Edition of the Mt Natib 50K Trail Run! Congratulations to all the Finishers!

Pictures: https://www.facebook.com/baldrunner/media_set?set=a.10203065381649124.1073741930.1043179758&type=3





Bulldog 50K Ultra Run

23 07 2008

Last Friday, I requested my son, John to register me on line for my first ultramarathon trail run which will be held on 23 August 2008 in Calabasas, California. Hereunder is my confirmation to join the said running event. Click the name of the race for the details.

 

This message is generated as confirmation of your recent registration on Active.com. You have been successfully registered for the following:

 

Registration:

Bulldog 50K Ultra Run

Purchase Date:

07/18/08

Category:

Bulldog 50K

Name:

Jovenal Narcise


CLICK HERE for a complete version of this registration.

 

 

 

Wish me good luck!








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