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Official Result: 2nd Tagaytay To Naic 100K Ultra Marathon Race

7 08 2017

2nd Tagaytay To Naic 100K Ultra Marathon Race

10:00 PM August 5, 2017 to 6:00 PM August 6, 2017

Starting Line: Tagaytay Picnic Grove, Tagaytay City

Finish Line: Naic Public Plaza/Covered Court, Naic, Cavite

Cut-Off Time: 20 Hours (9 Hours @ Km 50/Nasugbu Poblacion (Jollibee)

Number of Starters: 23 Runners

Number of Finishers: 23 Runners

Percentage of Finish: 100%

Tagaytay To Naic Start

Group Picture @ Starting Line

RANK            NAME                    TIME (Hrs)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Overall Champion & New Course Record) —- 11:20:23
  2. Bong Dizon (1st Runner-Up, Overall) —- 13:31:05
  3. Doris Manguiat (Female Champion & Female New Course Record) —- 14:00:24
  4. Aldrin Pallera (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) —- 14:02:09
  5. Rod Losabia —- 14:25:02
  6. Mhel Biscarra —- 14:55:32
  7. Rolan Cera —- 15:29:14
  8. Remy Caasi (1st Runner-Up, Female) —- 15:31:39
  9. Tess Leono (2nd Runner-Up, Female) —- 15:58:20
  10. Rose Betonio (Female) —- 16:04:59
  11. Dondon Talosig —- 16:44:11
  12. Gibo Malvar —- 16:50:27
  13. Kris Caleon —- 16:50:28
  14. Marilou Ingua (Female) —- 16:50:29
  15. Glenn Rosales —- 17:23:31
  16. Olan Ortines —- 17:31:52
  17. Kathleen Piñero (Female) —- 18:14:10
  18. Jeremy Blas —- 18:28:33
  19. Domingo Pateño —- 18:32:34
  20. Margie Pailaga (Female) —-18:51:12
  21. Barney Mamaril —- 18:51:13
  22. JP Navarrete —- 19:18:15
  23. Miles Evangelista (Female) —- 19:46:22
Tagaytay To Naic Champion

Overall Champion & New Course Record Holder Thomas Combisen

Tagaytay To Naic Female Champ

Female Champion & Female Course Record Holder Doris Manguiat

Congratulations To All The Finishers!

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Podium Finishers: 70th Edition of the Mt Fuji Mountain Race (July 28, 2017)

31 07 2017

Repost From Japan Running News:

New Champs Crowned as Gorotani and Yoshizumi Win Fuji Mountain Race Titles

Celebrating its 70th running this year, the Fuji Mountain Race took place on Friday, July 28. As in past years, the first 10.8 km from Fujiyoshida City Hall at 770 m elevation to Umagaeshi at 1450 m was a gentle climb on paved roads. From Umageshi runners enter trails, and for the kilometer from Hanagoya at the 7th Station all the way to the 8th Station it becomes a very difficult 40-degree incline climb. After that runners pass through an area of rough volcanic rocks as they approach Mt. Fuji’s summit. Peaking out with a net elevation difference of 3000 m, the 21 km Summit Course continues to gain a reputation as Japan’s premier mountain race. Last year bad weather forced the race to be stopped at Mt. Fuji’s 5th Station, meaning that this year’s race would be the first time in two years that  runners would finish at the peak.

In this year’s 70th running, former Hakone Ekiden uphill Fifth Stage standout Shun Gorotani (Comody Iida) won in 2:31:34, an excellent time just 3:53 off the course record. In the women’s race, world-class Sky Running Vertical Kilometer runner Yuri Yoshizumi won in 3:01:17, the fastest women’s winning time since 1988. Both won in their first attempts at the Summit Course.

Men’s winner Gorotani is just 24. As part of Toyo University‘s ekiden team he ran the Hakone Ekiden twice, finishing an outstanding 3rd on the uphill Fifth Stage in 2016 behind stage winner Daichi Kamino (Aoyama Gakuin University). Gorotani now runs for the Comody Iida corporate ekiden team. Last year he won the Fuji Mountain Race 5th Station short course, breaking the course record by a wide margin. Having qualified for the Summit Course, Gorotani returned to live up to expectations with another superlative win. Taking control of the race early, Gorotani opened up a lead of 14 minutes over 2nd-placer Satoshi Kato, yet another runner-up finish for Kato. Gorotani was misdirected by course marshals very early in the race, but officials judged the error to have had no impact on his result.

Women’s winner Yoshizumi began running as an amateur after she began working full-time, winning the 2013 Hokkaido Marathon in a PB 2:37:56. Changing her focus to trail running in 2015, Yoshizumi won the 2016 Sky Running Japan Series’ Vertical Kilometer Series title. In December last year she won the Sky Running Asian Championships MSIG Lantau Vertical Kilometer, and in May this year she won the Vertical Kilometer World Circuit’s Transvulcania Vertical Kilometer against Europe’s best athletes. Outside of the Vertical Kilometer, she finished 13th in last year’s IAU Trail World Championships Trans Peneda Geres 85 km, competing at the world level from her home base in Osaka. Like Gorotani, she won the Fuji Mountain Race 5th Station Course last year before coming back to win the Summit Course this year, finishing 9th overall.

Source article:
http://dogsorcaravan.com/2017/07/28/fuji-mountain-race-2017-result/
translated by Brett Larner
all photos © 2017 Koichi Iwasa, DogsorCaravan, all rights reserved





Official Result: 7th Fort Magsaysay To Dingalan 65K Ultra Marathon Race (FM2D 65)

25 07 2017

7th Fort Magsaysay To Dingalan 65K Ultra Marathon Race (FM2D 65K)

Start Time/Place: 4:00 AM July 23, 2017/Headquarters 7th Infantry Division, Philippine Army, Fort Magsaysay, Palayan City

Finish/Cut-Off Time/Place: 4:00 PM July 23, 2017/Sea Side Resto, Sitio Tanguigue, Barangay Aplaya, Dingalan, Aurora

Cut-Off Time: 12 Hours

Number Of Starters: 17 Runners

Number Of Finishers: 15 Runners

Percentage Of Finish: 88.23%

2017 FM2D Start

Group Picture @ Starting Area

RANK             NAME                TIME (Hrs)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Champion, Overall & Course Record) — 6:44:43
  2. Gibo Malvar (1st Runner-Up, Overall) — 8:04:54
  3. Dondon Talosig (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) — 8:13:12
  4. Kris Caleon ———– 8:15:22
  5. Rod Losabia ———- 9:13:45
  6. Glenn Rosales ——- 9:19:40
  7. Tess Leono (Champion, Female) —– 9:22:18
  8. Englebert Pantig ——- 9:24:40
  9. Kathleen Piñero (1st Runner-Up, Female) —- 9:26:50
  10. Peach Tamayo (2nd Runner-Up, Female) —- 10:49:59
  11. Richard Gy ————— 10:55:59
  12. JP Navarete ————– 11:01:39
  13. Anna Odessa Albaracin (Female) —- 11:16:33
  14. Mark Belaniso ———- 11:34:25
  15. Avin Sauler ———- 11:57:30
2017 FM2D Thomas Combisen

Overall Champion & Course Record Holder Thomas Combisen

2017 FM2D Tess Leono

Female Champion Tess Leono

Congratulations To All The Finishers!





Official Result: 7th PAU’s Tanay 50K Ultra Marathon Race

17 07 2017

2017/7th PAU’s Tanay 50K Ultra Marathon Race (Road)

Starting Area: Intersection Sampaloc Road & Manila East Highway, Tanay, Rizal

Start Time: 4:00 AM July 16, 2017 (Sunday)

Finish Area: Sierra Madre Hotel & Resort, Marikina-Infanta Highway, Tanay, Rizal

Finish Time: 1:00 PM July 16, 2017 (Sunday)

Cut-Off Time: 9 Hours

Number Of Starters: 31 Runners

Number Of Finishers: 30 Runners

Percentage Of Finish: 96.7%

2017 Tanay 50 02

Group Picture @ Starting Line

RANK              NAME                          TIME (Hours)

  1. Thomas Combisen (Champion, Overall) —– 5:03:06
  2. Frederick Peñalosa (1st Runner-Up, Overall) —- 6:07:06
  3. Mhel Biscarra (2nd Runner-Up, Overall) —- 6:15:45
  4. Aldrin Pallera ———————– 6:35:16
  5. Rod Losabia ————————- 6:37:19
  6. Remy Caasi (Champion, Female) ———– 6:37:39
  7. Gammy Tayao ———————- 6:39:07
  8. Almar Danguilan —————– 6:49:17
  9. Hope Brazil ————————- 6:51:34
  10. Bryan Taroma ——————— 6:56:25
  11. Kharl Ocampo ——————— 6:56:44
  12. Emerson Sto. Domingo ——– 6:56:50
  13. Gibo Malvar ———————— 6:58:57
  14. Dondon Talosig ——————- 6:59:37
  15. Kathleen Piñero (1st Runner-Up, Female) ——- 7:01:16
  16. Rolan Cera ————————– 7:22:12
  17. Michael Peralta —————— 7:24:42
  18. JP Navarette ———————– 7:33:46
  19. Emma Libunao (2nd Runner-Up, Female) ——– 7:40:01
  20. Marlon Santos ——————– 7:40:27
  21. Glenn Rosales ——————— 7:40:38
  22. Ronnel Go ————————– 7:49:36
  23. Glenn Adviento —————— 8:04:21
  24. Rona Saludes (Female) ——- 8:04:23
  25. Hermie Saludes —————– 8:04:26
  26. Jonas Olandria —————— 8:11:13
  27. Jonathan Moleta ————— 8:13:29
  28. Bernadette Schlester (Female) ——————- 8:15:59
  29. Arnold Pagaran —————- 8:24:29
  30. Reese Rogel (Female) ————- 8:59:48

   ***Jovie Narcise/RD ——————– 6:57:56

Thomas Combisen Tanay

Thomas Combisen, Overall Champion

Remy Caasi Tanay

Remy Caasi, Female Champion

Congratulations To All The Finishers! See you next year!

2017 Tanay 50 03

Scenery/View Along The Route

(Note: Pictures By Dmitri Conag Navarro & Remy Caasi on Facebook)





Rules & Regulations: Bataan Death March 102K & 160K Ultra Marathon Races

17 07 2017

Rules & Regulations: Bataan Death March 102K & 160K Ultra Marathon Races

Starting this month, I will be writing and publishing on this blog about the Rules and Regulations of the Bataan Death March 102K & 160K Ultra Marathon Races for the appreciation of those who will be joining the 2018 edition. These rules and regulations had been published on this blog but for better appreciation and awareness to all the runners, I will post each rule/regulation for each post so that I can make some stories of our observations on some of the violations or tell to everybody the reason/s why we impose such.

I admit that these rules and regulations, as a start, had been copied from well-known and prestigious International Ultra Marathon Races in other countries. And through the years, we made some adjustments and revisions of these rules/regulations as a result of our experiences in the past editions of these races, whether they are good or bad!

It should be noted that these rules and regulations are there for the safety of the runners, which is the paramount objective of its presence and implementation. The second reason is that we would like to maintain the prestige of the race and the history that goes with it. And the third and last reason is for easier, efficient and effective management of these races.

So, from time to time, I enjoin everybody to find time to visit this blog for these rules and regulations. It is the responsibility of the runner-participant to know and remember these rules and regulations. It is also their responsibility to disseminate these rules to the Driver of their Support Vehicle and their respective Support Crew. Ignorance of these rules and regulation will NOT excuse any violators of these rules/regulations as they are very easy to understand or comprehend.

Good luck to all the participants of the 2018/10th Edition of the Bataan Death March 102K Ultra Marathon Race and 8th Edition of the Bataan Death March 160K Ultra Marathon Race.

1st BDM 102 LOGO 1





“Mortal Sins” Of Pinoy Ultrarunners

6 07 2017

In my nine years as a Race Organizer and Race Director of Ultrarunning events in the Philippines, I have observed two distinct “mortal sins” of our local ultrarunners. I have mentioned these sins/concerns in my Race Reports as I am also guilty on these in my previous races, whether they are road or trail races.

First “mortal sin” is starting too fast on the course. Most of the runners are too excited to start the race and due to such excitement, the race strategy that one had prepared to be followed is completely lost and gone from the mind of the runner. Aside from the excitement, the fact that you are still running as a group among the starters adds the idea that you are better and faster than the runners in front of you! Your mind thinks that the race is just another 10K or a half-marathon distance or a marathon distance where you can easily finish the race without hiking or walking along the course.

A fast start on a race makes the runner to be uncontrollable even if his/her support crew would advise him/her to slow down. The sight of another runner, whether he is located in front or behind, gives a feeling of insecurity to the runner. Most of the time, it is that “macho” attitude that you can easily pass the runner in front of you to the point that you would observe every movement of the runner trying to find signs if the runner is slowing down. On the other hand, you have also that “fear” that you would be passed by the other runner behind you, knowing that the runner is weaker than you from your past running events with him. As much as possible, you would not like to be overtaken by that runner.

There is also the thinking or misconception that you are trying to be fast at the beginning or early phase of the race so that you have enough “buffer” or “miles on the bank” as spare if ever you will be walking or hiking on the later stage of the race. Most often, such “buffer” could be easily squandered or wasted by the second “mortal sin”.

Second and most abused “mortal sin” is staying too long for rest and “refueling” in a “pit stop”. Which means that if, in event that a Road Ultrarunner sees his/her Support Vehicle, the tendency of the runner is to stop the run (still far from the Vehicle) and then walk for a few meters to reach the Support Vehicle. Once the runner reaches the Support Vehicle, he/she can not decide which one to do first: drink, refill the bottles, or eat some food. More often, runners would forget to refill their bottles even if they stayed too long in their “pit stop”. Sometimes, they would simply sit if there is a chair being offered by their Support Crew. Even if their bottles are still filled with water and there is no need to stop, the mere sight of their Support Vehicle gives an excuse for the runner to stop and approach the vehicle. Even if they have still food stashed in their hydration pack, the runner would still ask for some food from their Support Crew.

In road or trail ultras, there are runners who would not like to sleep in the Aid Stations or near their Support Vehicle. Others would take it easy, compute their “buffer” time, and then simply take a nap or sleep. There is nothing wrong with sleeping or taking a nap during the event but this habit takes a lot of wasted time for the runners. If you have properly trained yourself for the expected night runs and did your assignment, then there is no need for you to have an extended sleep during the night run. I know of seasoned ultra runners who have trained for their night runs and made used of their training during the actual event. The result is that they have better finish times!

To some, their rest is coupled or combined with unnecessary change of outfits, change of shoes, and/or change of socks! In most of my ultra races where I’ve joined, the outfit that I have on the start of the race is the same outfit that I have once I cross the finish line. I am very fortunate that I’ve never experienced any blisters on my feet or chaffing on any part of my body during my races. I sweat a lot during races but I don’t change my outfit when they are wet even if I have extra dry outfit in my drop bags waiting at the Aid Stations!

There are some runners who would take a shower while the event is on-going. I have observed a lot of runners in my BDM Races who find time to have their shower at the halfway mark! I am not sure if they are doing this ritual when they are training for it. It is fine with me as long as they finish the race within the cut-off time of the event.

When the runner reaches and crosses the finish line, he/she is very happy and emotional that he/she had finished the race. However, once the Official Result is posted and published, the runner would scan on the list of finishers and look for the ranking of the other runners. Most of the time, the runner could not believe that another runner had a faster time than what he made in the event. That’s the only time that he/she would think of those times squandered or wasted because of these two “mortal sins” of every ultra runner had experienced.

The challenge now is to have a better time for the next edition! And this is the “third mortal sin” of every ultra runner! However, there are so many ways to avoid this “third mortal sin”. If you have a problem of controlling your pace or speed once the race starts, you have to relax and remember those training days you have put in preparation for this race. Start slow to warm-up your muscles and then slowly increasing your pace during the run. Listen to your body and gauge your pace on the effort you are exerting during the run. That is only half of the story. The other half is to be able to maintain your hydration and nutrition strategy to fuel up your body as you increase your pace. Whether it is a road or trail ultra race, I always start behind the pack of runners and slowly inching my way to the middle pack or among the upper 50% of the runners or sometimes finishing on the upper 20% of the runners.

With regards to being “hard-headed” in expecting comfort from the sight of your Support Vehicle or the location of the Aid Station, there are so many things that you should remember. First, do not stop and refill your bottles with water if you haven’t consumed anything from your bottles or hydration pack. If you want to eat, consume first the food you have stashed in your hydration pockets before you get refills from your Support Crew. Second, if you intend to refill your bottles and get some foods, make it fast and systematic! You should be back on the road and continue your run in less than 1-2 minutes! Third, for those would like to take a “nap”, make it short and ask your Support Crew to force you to wake up after the agreed number of minutes of “nap” time! Fourth, there is no need for showers, change of outfit, change of shoes and socks, and “selfies” during the race. Everybody smells the same once a runner is drenched by his/her sweat! As for the outfit, whatever worked comfortably with you during your LSDs in your training, use them! Fifth, train your self to eat and drink while you are power-hiking as this would minimize your time in the Aid Stations. Sixth, whether it is road or trail ultra, organize your needs in plastic containers with markings on what point or Kilometer point where you need such items stored inside them (placed inside the Support Vehicle in Road Ultras). In ultra trail races, make sure you know the items you placed inside your Drop Bags or better yet, have a list with you in your pocket as to which items you have in those Drop Bags.

If you commit these “mortal sins” repeatedly or had committed them and you want to improve on your performance, practice my advise during your runs as they are not hard to follow.

Lace up and go run!

pau-iau-logo

Official Logos Of PAU & IAU

 





2nd Week Of Training: Mt Fuji Mountain Race

30 06 2017

June 19-25, 2017

June 19, Monday, was a well-deserved REST Day for me after my weekend “back-to-back” training runs which culminated in a 10.5 mile recon run in Palayan City, Nueva Ecija & Fort Magsaysay. The heat of the sun on those exposed single-track trail put a lot of exhaustion and fatigue to my body system. I usually have a complete rest on this day by eating and having more time to sleep on Sunday and Monday evenings.

This week will be my first full week of training from Monday up to Sunday. On Tuesday, the training schedule was for me to do a 1:30-hour Endurance Run on a trail and I selected my Backyard’s Loop #2 Trail as my course. This course is what I fondly called as the “Brown Mountain” course which is a wide-dirt road and eventually turns into a single-track trail to the foot/peak of Mt Quadrante and Mt Tambong/Mt Maniwalan. I was able to cover a distance of 7.17 miles for 1:31+hours with an average speed of 12:42 minutes per mile. I observed that my run was very comfortable because of the cooler air as I started my run very early in the morning, before the sun rises.

On Wednesday, I had my first “hill repeats” or Interval Training workout. The total time for this workout, to include the warm-up run; hill repeats & rest between interval; and the cool-down run, would result to 1:30 hours. I did my “hill repeats” in a place where the housing subdivision was discontinued and the place was all mine in the early morning as there were no people in the area. It was my first time to feel the shortness of breath and the feeling of being dizzy as if I am going to have a “heart stroke” after I did my 4th repetition. I have to adjust my pace but I tried my best to push harder as I reach the highest elevation/end of my hill repeats in every repetition. I have to bring up my knees higher; swing my arms faster and wider; and breath as hard as I can. The total distance that I covered was 6.78 miles but I felt that I was able to force my heart and lungs to a higher level of exertion than I had before!

2nd Week Mt Fuji Training 00

Endurance Runs @ Backyard’s Loop #2 (Mt Tambo/Maniwalan At The Background)

On Thursday, I had my Recovery Run/Easy Run for one hour where I covered a distance of 5.20 miles. This was done on a paved road where the first half was slightly going uphill and then back to where I started.

On Friday, it was another 1:30-hour Endurance Run which I decided to have at the same course that I did last Tuesday (at my Backyard’s Loop #2). The same as of Tuesday’s run, I have to run up to the mountain for 45-46 minutes and then turn-around towards the starting line for the second-half of my workout. To my surprise, I was ahead or faster by 2:30 minutes when I reached the turn-around point during my run last Tuesday and I just continued my run for more elevation gain for the rest of my time before turning around for my last 45 minutes back to where I started. I was able to cover a distance of 7.63 miles on this workout!

On Saturday, I had my second “hill repeats” session, the same session/workout that I had last Wednesday but the total number of hours for this workout is 2:30 hours. Since it was the schedule of one of my PAU races (Mariveles To Bagac 50K Ultra Run), I have to think of a way where I can insert my training workout while I am supervising this race. Instead of “hill repeats” of going up the hill and then back down the hill, I improvised my “hill repeats” by continuously going up towards the peak or highest point of the course. So, I brought my vehicle to the highest point of the course, parked it, and then I started my warm-up run by going down the mountain for 40 minutes on an easy pace. From the point where I made my turn-around, I returned up to the mountain doing my “hill repeats”. After 1:20 hours, I continued my run and tried to catch up with the runners of my race. After 2:30 hours I was able to cover a distance of 13 miles. Since the road was not as steep as my “hill repeats” on Wednesday, I felt I did not push too hard and felt that I was still strong after the desired number of hours of my workout for the day had elapsed.

On Sunday, the goal was to practice running and hiking on a higher elevation gain for 4 hours which is a good equivalent of “double-traverse” to my Backyard’s Loop #3 (Mt Roosevelt Traverse). It was also a workout to train for my hydration and nutritional needs in longer runs with more elevation gain. I was in the company of PAU runners who just finished in the previous day’s 50K run! We had some rests and “pit stops” along the route but we were able to make it in 5 hours for a total distance of 13.3 miles. It was nice to be back on this course which I missed for the past 4 weeks. We had some delays on our uphill climb due to the growing tall grasses and plants that partly cover the trail. On our way back for our 2nd traverse, the sun was already hot as most of the trail is exposed to the sun. We slowed down due to the heat and I had to submerge myself to a flowing stream, 3 miles before the finish line! We ingested some solid foods and soda drinks at the turn-around point (Mile 6.6).

2nd Week Mt Fuji Training 01

At The Peak Of Mt Roosevelt With PAU Runners

Everyday, I have to force myself to sleep 8-9 hours every night and after my “hill repeats” sessions, I had to take a nap in the afternoon for some rest. My nutrition intake for the week consists of ordinary Filipino foods and fruits.

The following are the totals for this week:

Total Duration (Time): 13:40 Hours

Total Distance: 52.8 Miles/84.48 Kilometers

Total Elevation Gain: 21,795 Feet

Elevation Gain Per Mile: 412.78 Feet

Lace up and go run!








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