Recce/Recon

28 12 2012

Recce is a British English term while Recon is a North American English/Australian English term of the word Reconnaissance. The word is defined as:

Reconnaissance is a mission to obtain information by visual observation of other detection methods, about the activities and resources of the enemy or potential enemy, or about the meteorologic, hydrographic, or geographic characteristics of a particular area”. (From Reconnaissance: US Army Field Manual 7-92; Chapter 4)

In ultra trail running, the conduct of reconnaissance on the race course is a “must” if one has to establish full confidence to finish the race or even establish a better performance in the race. For elite and/or top-rated ultra runners, they make it a point to run through the course as part of their recce/recon. The “race course” is the “enemy” for every runner and he/she needs all the data about the enemy and defeats it at all costs. Conducting a recon run is no longer a “secret” among Champions. It is the Way of the Champions!

When brothers Gerald and Cresenciano Sabal won as Team Champion in the Mt Apo Boulder Face International Challenge last March of this year, I personally asked Gerald Sabal to consider competing for the 2013 Vibram Hongkong 100K Trail Run (HK100) and improve the past performance of the Pinoy elite runners in the said race. I got a positive reply from Gerald and the support of Andre Blumberg from Hongkong continues for the exposure of Pinoy runners in international running competitions.

In order to gain confidence and familiarity of the HK100 trail course, I brought Gerald Sabal to Hongkong last July this year with Andre Blumberg as our Host and Guide. We had a night run and a day run in two successive days along the second half and most difficult portions of the course. Our recce/recon was very fruitful as Gerald was able to experience the climate and to see for himself the condition and elevation of the course.

Andre & Gerald @ Needle Hill

Andre & Gerald @ Needle Hill

Andre & Bald Runner

Andre & Bald Runner

Took A Picture Of The Famous Bamboo Snake Along The Course

Took A Picture Of The Famous Bamboo Snake Along The Course

Marcelo’s continuous winnings in my ultra races in every month and for being the Champion in the 1st PAU National Championship in Guimaras, Andre Blumberg of Hongkong asked me if Marcelo could also join Gerald Sabal for the 2013 HK100 Trail Run. I immediately approved of the proposal. So, for the 2013 HK100 Trail Run, Andre Blumberg of Hongkong had sponsored for the Registration Fees, Round-Trip Tickets and Accommodation for Gerald Sabal and Marcelo Bautista. Andre Blumberg had been consistently the “Good Samaritan” of our elite Ultrarunners.

2nd Day Recce/Recon Run

2nd Day Recce/Recon Run

Always Behind These Two Fast Trail Runners

Always Behind These Two Fast Trail Runners

McLehose Trail In Hongkong

McLehose Trail In Hongkong

If you are wondering why an international runner, as an individual, is the one who have been initiating and offering support to our elite ultrarunners to international races, I am also wondering why? Instead of asking him why he is doing this support, we should ask ourselves and our corporate entities in the country why we are not supporting our elite runners to international exposure.

Two weeks ago, Andre Blumberg came to the country to participate in the 2nd edition of the Taklang Damulag 100-Mile Endurance Run and he brought with him running kit/apparel, equipment, and nutrition for Marcelo and Gerald. The two runners had been adapting and “breaking-in” on the nutrition & equipment provided by Andre as they are now training in Baguio City/Benguet Province. Their “new” nutrition is giving them better performance in their training.

The "Good Samaritan", Marcelo, & BR @ 2nd Taklang Damulag 100-Mile Endurance Run

The “Good Samaritan”, Marcelo, & BR @ 2nd Taklang Damulag 100-Mile Endurance Run

For the past two weeks, Gerald and Marcelo had been training hard in the mountains in Baguio/Benguet (Mts. Cabuyao & Santo Tomas); stairs running & repeats at the Lourdes Grotto; trail running loops at the Camp John Hay Complex; speed drills & stretching workouts; and LSDs to Ambuklao Dam and back to Baguio City. Such training is geared towards teamwork, nutrition & hydration strategy, pacing, dependability of running equipment, high altitude, strength-endurance, and most of all, running in a cold environment.

Gerald and Marcelo had been consistently running in Baguio City/Benguet when the temperature is at its lowest (starting at 2:00 AM up to 6:00 AM). Going up to the peak of Mount Santo Tomas on the early morning (4 AM) on Christmas Day gave them a cold temperature with gusty winds experience, the same situation they will experience at the peak of Tai Mo San (900+ masl), the highest elevation of the HK100 course! So far, their acclimatization training had been very successful. Their cold environment is geared towards being able to run with light apparel with the 8-10 degrees Celsius temperature on Race Day.

Gerald & Marcelo @ The Peak Of Mt Sto. Tomas (2,260 MASL)

Gerald & Marcelo @ The Peak Of Mt Sto. Tomas (2,260 MASL)

Teamwork! Gerald & Marcelo Descending From Mt. Sto. Tomas

Teamwork! Gerald & Marcelo Descending From Mt. Sto. Tomas

The two runners will arrive in Hongkong with at least two days to recon the course and acclimatize to the prevailing climate/weather in the area. There will be NO special foods (5-Star Hotel Buffet) for them before the race and no NEW running kit/equipment to be used for the race. More sleep and rest will be waiting for them in Hongkong prior to the conduct of the race.

Target goal for the two runners? Hoping and praying that they will land on the Top 15 Finishers and with a Finish Time of Sub-11 Hours.

Let us join hands in supporting Gerald and Marcelo in the 2013 Hongkong 100K Trail Run and to their future International Ultrarunning Races!

To Andre, thank you very much for being the “Good Samaritan” to our elite ultrarunners!





“4-Minute” Workout

26 12 2012

For those who are in the know of this kind of workout, it is simply called “Tabata” Interval Workout. It is an intense workout created and studied by a Japanese Sports Scientist Izumi Tabata whose duration is only FOUR MINUTES! According to his studies, exposing this workout to athletes, on a regular basis, had greatly improved their aerobic and anaerobic capabilities.

It is simply done by doing the exercise (of choice) in 20 seconds and then resting for another 10 seconds. This repetition (of exercise and rest) is done for eight (8) times, totalling to 240 seconds or 4 minutes. The intensity of the selected exercise could be fast/hard, moderate, or easy, depending on one’s capability.

This workout can be done indoors or when you feel bored/sleepy in the house or in the office or in the classroom. You can start with a single exercise or combine it with other exercises depending on the duration of your planned workout.

As for me, I usually complete a 4-minute workout for a certain exercise before going to the next exercise that I want. Some athletes would prefer to alternate one exercise to another. There are no strict rules to follow as long as you do one exercise for eight (8) repetitions.

To strengthen my legs, I usually do the following exercises one at a time by following the Tabata Protocol (20 seconds exercise, 10 seconds rest, 8 reps):

Jumping Jacks

Body Weight Squats

“100 Ups”

Forward Lunges

“High Knees”

It will take me 20 minutes to complete these exercises with my shirt and short soaked with my sweat! I usually do this workout at least twice a week inside the house. However, I still do some light stretching before and after my Tabata Workout.

I use my Gymboss or my handheld digital stopwatch to time my workout.

You can devise you own set of exercises depending on what part of your body you want to be strengthened. You can also use some weights or other exercise tools for this workout.

Tabata Workout/Protocol can be applied in your speed training on the oval track, hill repeats or on your “speed bursts” on the road & trails. The possibilities of applying this protocol to your workout/exercises are endless.

Try it and you will be amazed how easy you can heat up your body or see your sweat dropping on the floor or your clothes being damp/wet with your own sweat.

For more information and details, please visit http://tabatatraining.org/





Getting Back My Speed

22 12 2012

Interval workout in an oval track or in a measured-loop course is one of the best ways to improve one’s speed in running. Whether you are training for the usual long distance runs from 3K to Marathon or even Ultra Marathon Races, a runner needs to incorporate speed workouts to his training program.

Having been absent in local races for the past months and weeks, I continued to do my LSDs on the roads, trails and mountains as I slowly recovered from my running-related injury. But my LSDs and peak-bagging feats made me a slower runner on the roads but made me a stronger runner on the trails.

For the past 3 weeks, I’ve started running again on city roads and I monitored my LSD pace for these runs. I’ve observed that I could run an average of 7.5K per hour speed which I think is an appropriate ultra marathon speed to finish an ultra distance within the prescribed cut-off time. But for a marathon pace, such speed is a “death march” pace to the finish!

I wanted to improve my speed to the range of 8-8.5K per hour and for me to get into that range of speed is to do some interval workout. I started doing my interval workout at the Philippine Army Grandstand/Parade Ground Jogging Lane. The course is flat, paved and it is approximately 1-kilometer loop (actually it lacks 3-5 meters which is very negligible). This is where I started doing my weekly 1K interval repeats in five (5) repetitions with 400-500 meters as walking breaks in between.

What is different and unique in my interval workouts is that I do it after one hour of snorkling/swimming at the Philippine Army Swimming Pool and it is usually done from 11:30-12:30 noon time. Yes, that’s how crazy I am in my present training. That is the reason why my skin is becoming darker everyday! (Note: One-half of the loop is partially shaded with trees)

My first week interval workout data gave me an average of 5:30 minutes/km pace and my average LSD speed increased to 8K per hour. My second week interval workout gave me an average of 5:20 minutes/km pace and my average LSD speed increased to 8.5K per hour. Lately, my third week interval workout gave me an average of 5:10 minutes/km pace and my average LSD speed increased to 9.0K per hour. In my rough estimate, it’s within 10:45 minutes/mile range and if I can sustain such pace, I can run a full marathon in 4:42 to 4:45 hours. Not bad for a Senior Citizen!

Even if I immediately wear my running shoes after coming out of the swimming pool and do my jogging to the Parade Ground, I still do my warm-up easy run for 1K; do some basic stretching to my calf muscles, quads, hamstrings, glutes and ITBs; and do some brief speed drills like “knee-high” or “100-ups”, butt kicks, and bouncing lunges! After my interval workout, I have to do also another 1K “cool-down” jog or brisk walk before I end up with my post-stretching exercises, the same ritual before the workout, except for the speed drills.

Since is it very hot at noon time, I see to it that I have to drink water every time I finish one repetition of the workout. It is only after the workout that I ingest food and drink my sports drinks. (Note: There are water fountains along the jogging lane)

If you want to get faster and more consistent in your training and races, don’t forget to include an interval workout in your training program, at least, once a week. There are other ways and means to make you faster but I’ll have to reserve that in my future posts.

Remember, interval workout is the reason why the runner in front of you is faster and stronger! You can do it, too! And ultimately, beat the runner who had been passing you or the guy in front of you!

Mt Samat Mt Miyamit 438

(Note: Don’t be misled why I’ve been swimming a lot. Swimming is a part of my cure/treatment to my injury and I use it as an “extender”/cross-training workout for my ultra running training)





“Take Five”

20 12 2012

This is the most popular jazz composition of the late Dave Brubeck, who just died few weeks ago before reaching the age of 92 years old and also the famous jazz pianist who led the Dave Brubeck Jazz Quartet known throughout the world. Listening to the rendition of “Take Five” simply brings back the music of Dave Brubeck in to my mind.

“Take Five” and the Dave Brubeck Jazz Quartet had started the proliferation of contemporary jazz music and inspired others to love such kind of music.

Last October of this year counts as my Fifth Year Anniversary in blogging and thinking of where I am right now blows my mind of reminiscing the past years of trying to share my experiences and adventures in running to my readers. This blog evolved by itself from a daily journal of my runs and training/preparations for my incoming races which turned to narration of detailed Race Reports of each race that I joined. I am sure that these Race Reports were accepted by Race Organizers as feedback to improve on their future races. Ideas brought about as a result of my experiences, observations, and researches made through journals, books and other resources in the Internet gave birth to plans. And these plans were brought to action.

Early next year will be the staging of the 5th Bataan Death March 102K Ultra Marathon Race (BDM 102) and this event is my gauge on how far I’ve been into serious running and blogging. It is also my gauge on how far has the running community in the country had been influenced and inspired to train, prepare, and experience what is like to finish an ultra marathon distance. And it seems that runners see this event as the “Holy Grail” of running experience and accomplishment. This event transformed me into Race Organizer and Director for Ultra Running Events in the country. And I was able to inspire and influence others to do the same and spread the conduct of ultra running events in other parts of the country.

I’ve created an Elite Team of Runners and made them as Champions and Podium Finishers. I’ve created a Sports Federation for Ultrarunning in the country and we are ably represented in Ultra Running Events in other countries sanctioned by the International Association of Ultrarunners (IAU) by bringing some of our elite runners to these events. Other local ultrarunners are finding their way to join ultra running events in Asia, Europe, and the USA. But what is most important is that we are slowly transforming the country as the center/mecca of ultrarunning events in ASIA and Southeast ASIA through the Bataan Death March 160K & 102K Ultra Marathon Races (BDM 160/BDM 102); the Taklang Damulag 100-Mile Endurance Run (TD 100); West Coast 200K Multi-Day Stage Run (WC 200); and other ultra events that are staged/scheduled almost every month in the country.

Soon, an ultrarunner can have a choice of at least two (2) ultrarunning events in a period of one month! Race Organizers in other parts of the country are sprouting fast for the past years and most of their races have qualifying points for most of the popular ultrarunning events in the world. All of these occurrences in ultra running are unprecedented and more runners are attracted to the challenge and determination to finish such events.

So, where is this blog going for the next FIVE years? It will still be a blog, of course! It will remain as my journal of my running experiences and adventures here and abroad. I will also feature my thoughts, ideas, plans, observations, and things/persons about running and ultra running. It will also continue as the resource of ultrarunning in the country.

Just like the music “Take Five” and the Dave Brubeck Jazz Quartet, this blog will continue as a “pioneer” in running events/adventures and as inspiration for others to explore what they are capable of in terms of endurance and determination.

In simple terms, this blog will always remain about RUNNING.

Bald Runner (Photo By Jojo Brito)

Bald Runner (Photo By Jojo Brito)





Official Results: Taklang Damulag 100-Mile & 50-Mile Endurance Runs

16 12 2012

2nd Taklang Damulag 100-Mile & 50-Mile Endurance Runs

December 15-16, 2012

Fort Magsaysay, Palayan City

Number of Starters For 100-Mile Run: 22

Number of Finishers For 100-Mile Run: 9

Percentage of Finishers: 40.9%

Cut-Off Time: 32 Hours

RANK N  A    M  E TIME (Hrs)
1 Allan Lee (Champion, Course Record) 29:29:43
2 Graciano Santos (1st Runner-Up, CR) 30:00:45
3 Yob Red (2nd Runner-Up, CR) 30:49:25
4 Bong Alindada (CR) 30:59:22
5 Mark Jolin 31:11:26
6 Elmar Bob Tolete 31:20:40
7 Seow Kong Ng 31:21:42
8 Calvin John Escandor 31:23:15
9 Dindo Diaz 31:41:46
     
  Taklang Damulag 50-Mile Run  
     
1 Jeffrey Diaz (Champion) 13:45:14
2 Ronnel Go (1st Runner-Up) 14:38:07
3 Edrick Nicdao (2nd Runner-Up) 17:03:00
Nine (9) Finishers

Nine (9) Finishers

Congratulations to the nine (9) finishers of 2012 TD100 Endurance Run!





Official Result: 4th Tagaytay To Nasugbu (T2N) 50K Ultra Marathon Race

5 12 2012

4th PAU’s Tagaytay To Nasugbu (T2N) 50K Ultra Marathon Race

4:30 AM December 2, 2012/Picnic Grove, Tagaytay City To Nasugbu, Batangas

Starters: 306

Finishers: 304

Cut-Off Time: 9 Hours

Rank Bib # Name Time
1 747 Marcelo Bautista (1st, CR) 3:52:34
2 998 Jose Randy Duenas (2nd) 4:26:30
3 997 Manolito Anyaya (3rd) 4:37:26
4 897 Cornelio Veluz 4:48:41
5 999 Sandy Alentajan 4:57:33
6 734 Gilbert Anama 4:59:37
7 874 Rex Marvin Superiano 5:00:58
8 W964 Ian Piza 5:05:12
9 701 Graciano Santos 5:07:49
10 963 Edwin Zoleta 5:10:49
11 806 Rafael Barolo 5:13:33
12 712 Bong Gallarda 5:17:20
13 930 Ruben Pascual 5:19:43
14 892 June Val Sta. Ana 5:21:46
15 723 Tin Ferrera (F, 1st) 5:21:53
16 706 Jhun Juan 5:24:21
17 952 Dante Sagayap 5:25:35
18 835 Edwin Fernandez 5:26:15
19 964 Ronald Marquez 5:28:21
20 769 Nelson Garcia 5:28:39
21 955 Cecile Yuson (F, 2nd) 5:30:05
22 814 Saul Alfaro 5:31:34
23 786 Angelo Maravilla 5:32:24
24 799 Jerome Bautista 5:32:25
25 870 Mark Anthony Sigue 5:33:45
26 829 Neil Jhamfrens Broncano 5:34:05
27 985 Aumelio Estavillo Pascua 5:35:00
28 879 Mark Terrado 5:35:01
29 714 Jay Juanir 5:35:56
30 W962 Elmer Caballes 5:36:21
31 956 Nelson Mercado 5:37:34
32 813 Ritchie Amansec 5:37:15
33 977 Jimmy S. Collado 5:40:59
34 W955 Zan Cagulangan 5:41:49
35 717 Obeth Malana 5:41:56
36 W943 Albert Bartilad 5:42:00
37 726 Efren Cusi 5:42:43
38 720 Jonel De Ocampo 5:43:20
39 951 Glairold Recella 5:45:43
40 710 William Marino 5:46:05
41 764 Junifer Frenila 5:46:34
42 743 Ronald Canilao 5:48:08
43 740 Haydee Ann Chamorro (F, 3rd) 5:48:44
44 705 Gerry Lita 5:49:48
45 W944 Noel Dy 5:49:52
46 792 Leonel Mañago 5:50:o9
47 91 Winifred Casino 5:50:26
48 722 Raymond Policarpio 5:51:11
49 W957 Amos Adalim 5:52:07
50 709 Nestor Ramirez 5:52:10
51 778 Macky Chamorro 5:52:29
52 974 Renzo Lerio 5:52:51
53 724 Joel Custodio 5:53:11
54 W953 Jeric Augusto Redillas 5:54:12
55 860 Raymond Racaza 5:54:14
56 991 Celedonio Quinto 5:56:50
57 W963 Jeffrey Velasco 5:57:20
58 959 John Paul Rementina 5:57:38
59 516 Raul Soriano 5:58:16
60 927 RJ Knight 5:58:24
61 923 Ricky Sauro 5:59:57
62 732 Mark Aethen Agana 5:59:36
63 956 Rolando de Juan Jr. 6:00:23
64 971 Hermie Saludes 6:00:41
65 864 Den Saluta 6:00:42
66 846 Peterson Ong 6:00:45
67 793 Eli Malicden 6:01:18
68 976 Calvin John Escandor 6:01:22
69 819 Ric Delmo 6:01:24
70 725 Ricky Sangalang 6:01:29
71 987 Ronel Medina 6:03:20
72 750 Dennis  Carcamo 6:04:44
73 949 Allan Leandro Merin 6:05:02
74 957 Marlon Rivera 6:06:58
75 775 Jane Lim (F) 6:07:22
76 962 Elmer Caballes 6:08:25
77 867 Emerson Sto. Domingo 6:08:49
78 900 Allfred Kher 6:09:14
79 994 Angie Lacaba (F) 6:09:42
80 795 Pojie Peñones 6:09:43
81 943 Mark Ore 6:09:44
82 W952 Johann Marquez 6:10:20
83 884 Wilfredo Vellon Veluz 6:11:24
84 856 Jojo Ramos 6:13:49
85 788 Jerry Adriano 6:14:02
86 918 William San Jose 6:14:19
87 984 Carlo Gonzales 6:15:07
88 895 Arnel Timbreza 6:15:09
89 912 Armando Olan 6:15:27
90 811 Doodsie Mallari 6:15:33
91 W965 Glen Santos 6:16:09
92 776 Rico Laplana 6:16:49
93 76 Dexter dela Cruz 6:17:16
94 978 Jon Borbon 6:17:48
95 932 Alan Alban 6:18:44
96 744 Jonathan Colao 6:20:27
97 741 Jefferlyn Castillano (F) 6:20:28
98 869 Alwyn Sy 6:20:49
99 876 Katrina Sarsonas (F) 6:20:49
100 772 Emma Gabriel (F) 6:21:44
101 916 Marlon Saracho 6:22:02
102 837 Trodge Lorenzo 6:25:01
103 863 Anjoe Resurreccion 6:25:16
104 748 Gil Conanan 6:26:20
105 754 Mary Gold dela Cruz (F) 6:28:00
106 721 Roy Santos 6:30:28
107 899 Tony Viernez 6:30:29
108 770 Rosaldo Gijapon 6:30:30
109 982 Ted Famatiga 6:31:49
110 757 Jaylord Ballao 6:32:05
111 848 Melvin Pangan 6:32:28
112 875 Walter Benitez 6:32:30
113 W941 Chaps Grande 6:32:49
114 859 Roden Jesus Rosin 6:33:46
115 763 Donnie Especio 6:33:56
116 873 Jojo Santiago 6:35:10
117 805 Rollyn Manalo 6:35:43
118 779 Guillermo Lim II 6:35:54
119 965 Jeffrey Diaz 6:36:17
120 W954 Rodell Mendoza 6:36:20
121 850 Dale Basas Prado 6:36:33
122 889 RJ Sison 6:38:17
123 933 Mark Conrad Molina 6:38:48
124 785 Randy Miranda 6:38:50
125 973 Paolo Martin Lalas 6:39:10
126 843 Abet Ocampo (F) 6:39:12
127 715 Edwin Almario 6:39:32
128 866 Mike Santos 6:41:17
129 970 Jhunbie Serna 6:41:45
130 826 Alvin Avo 6:42:08
131 993 Venn A. Lamela 6:42:15
132 809 Raymund Geloca 6:42:36
133 817 Choy Bernal 6:43:20
134 718 Rolando San Miguel 6:44:17
135 960 Edward Penaflor 6:44:40
136 751 Bong Capiton 6:44:57
137 980 Clyde Imperio 6:46:52
138 926 Jayson Canete 6:47:16
139 832 Lloyd Chua 6:47:29
140 466 Oliver de Guzman 6:47:29
141 907 Boei Sabio 6:47:51
142 731 Ryan Anthony Albino 6:49:26
143 501 Carlo Jay Fernandez 6:49:50
144 777 Ipe Mascarenas 6:50:33
145 1000 Carl Balagot 6:50:35
146 917 Sigmund Santiago 6:50:43
147 929 Christian Malig 6:50:59
148 736 Reyan Aquino 6:51:06
149 756 Michael Chan 6:51:40
150 903 Arnel Villanueva 6:51:42
151 909 Lilibeth Nicdao (F) 6:52:07
152 902 Virgil Mañago 6:52:18
153 W948 Ronald Robles 6:52:53
154 990 Liza Paule (F) 6:52:54
155 915 Mark Jay Sidamon 6:52:55
156 958 Carlo Rosas 6:52:56
157 762 Bernard Enriquez 6:54:04
158 885 Oliver Agustin 6:55:21
159 804 Myla Go (F) 6:56:33
160 890 Hanna Rose Pua (F) 6:56:54
161 729 Adrian Aquino 6:57:11
162 947 Rochelle Sumagang (F) 6:57:54
163 780 Jennylee Malijan (F) 6:58:25
164 753 Roxanne Catubig (F) 6:59:09
165 942 Godfrey Palpallatoc 6:59:45
166 938 Ray Erwin Abenido 6:59:46
167 825 Donald Ancheta 7:00:28
168 849 Thony Pelera 7:01:37
169 807 Jeffrey Garcia 7:01:38
170 791 Virgil Mañago 7:02:59
171 713 Julius Castillano 7:04:17
172 883 Jon Ogsimer 7:06:35
173 794 Erick Jayson Maddela 7:06:56
174 946 Merwin Torres 7:07:23
175 988 Maila Rostrata (F) 7:07:25
176 947 Rochelle Sumagang (F) 7:07:27
177 W958 Romeo Onira 7:07:37
178 810 Ted Mallen 7:07:49
179 820 Mark Jayson Antonio 7:08:02
180 716 Bong De Guzman 7:08:05
181 W950 Ricardo Catangay 7:08:47
182 822 Oliver Agustin 7:09:04
183 738 Antonio Baga 7:09:38
184 921 Darwin Silao 7:09:51
185 967 Dennis Lopez 7:10:25
186 881 Ghansky Tolentino 7:10:52
187 940 Japhet Grande 7:12:57
188 979 Jeff Kristoffer Lualhati 7:14:14
189 861 Arlene Resolme (F) 7:14:18
190 908 Orlando Ylaya 7:16:06
191 857 Reese Rogel 7:17:06
192 496 Jeffrey Enverga 7:17:27
193 851 John Bryan Pacia 7:18:57
194 852 Leigha Pacia (F) 7:18:58
195 936 Rod Pagdilao 7:20:44
196 937 Gracielle Daya (F) 7:20:45
197 945 Jomar Dayandante 7:21:44
198 761 Raffy Estavillo 7:21:52
199 865 Ralph Singzon 7:22:16
200 925 Elaine Yabut (F) 7:22:44
201 749 Jelmar Cauba 7:23:20
202 827 Rholand Andaya 7:23:21
203 774 Angelo Kaufmann 7:23:22
204 913 Jerson Patron 7:23:23
205 737 Jon Banaag 7:24:07
206 816 Fernando Balane 7:24:24
207 834 Rizzalyn Damaso (F) 7:24:26
208 719 Arnie Martinez 7:24:45
209 739 Rem Baltazar 7:25:07
210 868 Jeffrey Furigay 7:25:21
211 767 Heide Garcia (F) 7:26:26
212 877 Laurence Tomas 7:26:27
213 975 Joel Sison 7:27:03
214 905 Myk Torres 7:29:14
215 790 Mahal Mariano 7:31:15
216 931 Renz Sabinorio 7:31:16
217 823 Alvin Analupa 7:31:17
218 784 Svethlana Maguslog (F) 7:31:53
219 844 Jhunie Oro 7:31:56
220 802 Sherryl Gumban (F) 7:33:02
221 W949 Roger Villareal 7:33:04
222 906 Benjie Omalin 7:33:17
223 905 7:33:18
224 901 Edmund Kagahastian 7:33:19
225 742 Philippides Cayetano 7:33:41
226 961 Allenstein Co 7:33:56
227 872 Carlo Serrano 7:34:00
228 839 Bong Leaño 7:34:49
229 W942 Pjong Dela Paz 7:37:06
230 521 William Hernandez 7:38:04
231 880 Ramie John Tuando 7:38:29
232 882 Reza Tordilla (F) 7:38:53
233 831 John Klein Chua 7:39:00
234 972 Raymond Sevilla 7:39:03
235 886 Ria Zagala (F) 7:39:06
236 910 Rizal Boy Ortega 7:39:36
237 W945 Brian Casoria 7:40:00
238 969 Gilbert Rada 7:41:00
239 871 Ryann Sison 7:41:28
240 966 Joseph Brian Suficencia 7:41:29
241 W951 Crisanto Cayago 7:42:52
242 995 Byron Bantilan 7:43:25
243 847 Lindsey Ochoa (F) 7:44:30
244 893 David Narvaez 7:44:41
245 752 John Christian Campomanes 7:44:42
246 981 Allan Gregor Bulos 7:46:38
247 745 Francis Chua 7:46:48
248 755 Michael Catemprate 7:47:00
249 983 Maria Vicenta Gado (F) 7:47:01
250 948 Stephanie Hefti (F) 7:47:02
251 887 Angie Tan (F) 7:47:47
252 862 Louie Rosales 7:53:01
253 855 Jeremy Ramos 7:53:02
254 W940 Henry Gonzales 7:53:08
255 773 Marcus Jocson 7:55:25
256 803 Francis Tuvera 7:55:26
257 858 Jojo Paguia 7:55:40
258 783 Ma. Elizabeth Marañon (F) 7:56:17
259 782 Restie Marañon 7:56:18
260 735 Donald Ausa 7:56:19
261 766 Mark Gallardo 7:56:20
262 989 Alvin N. Rodriguez 7:56:21
263 845 Mark Chester Obligado 7:56:55
264 830 Kristine Joy Cerame (F) 7:58:42
265 836 Jonard Aries Gamboa 7:58:43
266 996 George Co Jr. 8:01:01
267 898 Noel Malco 8:01:23
268 878 Reena Mabiog (F) 8:01:32
269 730 Eduardo Añonuevo 8:03:32
270 824 Maui Alvarracin 8:04:36
271 838 Joseph Ligot 8:04:47
272 992 Joanna P. Liu (F) 8:04:52
273 953 Sharon Sandoval (F) 8:08:02
274 954 Ronald Rey Cruz 8:08:03
275 787 Arnold Mendoza 8:16:58
276 919 Christopher John Sta. Cruz 8:17:00
277 842 Marie Joyce Negapatan (F) 8:17:01
278 968 Chona Saldivar (F) 8:17:16
279 904 Nelson Tupaz 8:17:54
280 808 Errol Flynn Regaya 8:18:00
281 798 Armand Belen 8:21:38
282 759 Ghry Esler 8:21:39
283 765 Marjee Guysayko (F) 8:22:46
284 801 Edwina Porciuncula (F) 8:23:44
285 914 Fredolin Savinorio V 8:23:45
286 833 Aiza Castañeda (F) 8:24:53
287 950 Mart Cruz 8:26:46
288 986 Fredolin Savinorio VI 8:28:49
289 888 Marissa Chua (F) 8:30:38
290 854 Arvin David Quilloy 8:32:04
291 815 Yolly Barja (F) 8:32:05
292 941 Allan Macaraig 8:32:35
293 939 Daniel Malangis 8:32:50
294 758 Hyacinth Dadap (F) 8:34:03
295 708 Neri Valero 8:35:18
296 789 Arnel Manzano 8:37:17
297 924 Francis Oliver Trinidad 8:43:54
298 896 Henry Ren 8:50:15
299 840 Richard Navarro 8:50:17
300 944 King Mark Patricio 8:56:17
301 W946 Lex Yumol 8:56:46
302 841 Melchor Nicolas 8:57:14
303 W959 Juliet Amazona (F) 9:12:26
304 W960 Garry Garcia 9:12:28







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